River, stream, or creek cabins in Oregon

With quiet beaches, vibrant cities, and massive expanses of forest, Oregon has something for everyone.

98% (5493 reviews)
98% (5493 reviews)

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12 top river, stream, or creek cabins sites in Oregon

98%
(914)

Molalla Ripple

12 sites · Lodging, RVs, Tents25 acres · Mulino, OR
Welcome to Molalla Ripple! Enjoy the sound of the Molalla River rolling over the rocks. Wake up to birds chirping and tall trees swaying in the breeze. The campsites are sixty feet apart for privacy and one path leads to the river with two private beach areas to relax. NOTE, Please use the clean bathrooms provided. DO NOT USE THE WOODS or camp site as your bathroom room. Thank you, let's keep things clean and safe for others to enjoy! Jsm Ranch started in 2004 when we moved from Oregon City. This once was a working farm with two chicken barns and a meat locker barn. All had been fallen into disrepair before taking owner ship. In 2007 we planted 200 tree's and 100 shrubs to build a new fish and wildlife habitat along Woodcock Creek. We then focused on building fence along the Molalla River to protect water quality. From there, we started raising Black Angus in 2008 after spending four years cleaning up the fields to make it safe for animals. We strive to be good stewards with our land as we continue to work with Clackamas Soil and Water to make better working lands. You're only minutes away from the town of Molalla to grab a bite, groceries or other camp items. Also have Molalla Rodeo just 3 minutes away on July 1-4th. You won't be disappointed for a great breakfast at Tammy D's (Mulino, OR), sandwiches at Humble Pig or pizza at Bear Creek Pizza & Pub.
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$30
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98%
(2467)

Cedar Bloom

157 sites · Lodging, RVs, Tents100 acres · Cave Junction, OR
Cedar Bloom was purchased in the spring of 2017 by Spirit Weavers Gathering as a place of peace and healing, for all walks of life. Spirit Weavers is an annual women's gathering which happens once a year each June. We host over 1,200 women in just two weeks on the land. Our beautiful forested land is located in Southern Oregon, in a small town off the 199 Redwood Highway. The land which we call home is 100 acres of beautiful protected forest and sits upon a mile of the Illinois River. We are very fortunate to be surrounded by a widely diverse population of flora and fauna. As caretakers of this sacred land, we feel a strong responsibility to honor our plant and animal allies by not only protecting them and their habitat, but also to help educate others about what lives and grows here by providing people with opportunities to experience the beauty of these plants and animals for themselves. For this reason, We are honored to host the many different groups who will gather here on this land for learning and communing with the nature that flourishes here. We feel very fortunate to be involved in this process of helping promote a sustainable and abundant future for all living things on this planet by sharing knowledge and skills from the human past that can make a sustainable lifestyle a reality for everyone everywhere. This is our home and we are happy to share it with you!
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$55
 / night
100%
(8)

Mt. Hood Enchanted Forest

4 sites · Lodging, Tents17 acres · Sandy, OR
The property is 17 acres of enchanted forestland with 300ft of Sandy River frontage. Both sides of the river are part of the Enchanted Forest There are a few walking paths and plenty of room to roam. Bring your paddle board or kayak to enjoy the river (Dependent on river level/current strength) The property is located within 2 miles from the Sandy Ridge Mountain bike trails and Barlow Wayside hiking trails. It's approximately 20 minutes to Government camp, ~ 35 minutes to Timberline for skiing and biking and an additional ~ 15 minutes to Mt. Hood Meadows. Approximately 50 min to PDX airport, and 1 hour to downtown Portland.
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$33
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98%
(99)

Crater Lake Private Woodlands

5 sites · Lodging, RVs, Tents100 acres · Prospect, OR
Private and protected forest woodlands, trails, wildlife, ponds, wildflowers, old growth timber and views. Unspoiled nature at its best! We are located in southern Oregon near Crater Lake NP, just off of hwy 62, part of the Rogue-Umpqua Scenic Byway, more commonly known as the "highway of waterfalls" and near the little town of Prospect on what is known as the beautiful side of Crater Lake NP. Three waterfalls, the Prospect Cafe, and the Historic Hotel are all within a two-mile radius. If you're after that famous pie at Beckie's Cafe, you are 10 minutes close. Our 100 acre ranch allows us to host guests in their own RV's, at camp/tent sites, or in our new A-frame Cabin all located in private, and even secluded, sites. Several well maintained trails wind throughout the property and can be enjoyed by guests. Nature enthusiasts enjoy the hiking, wildlife viewing, and the beautiful ponds and woods. Crater Lake Woodlands is part of the historic Katydid Ranch. Once owned by Boise Cascade who used it both for growing seedlings to replant logged mountain sides and as a vacation getaway for their executives, the story of Katydid Ranch goes back to the early 1900's when it's owner named "Katy" used it as the "half-way" overnight lodging for horse & buggy guests traveling to Crater Lake from the Rogue Valley. Leaving the valley at the crack of dawn, they could arrive at "Katy's" by nightfall, in time for a meal and sound mountain sleep. They'd hitch up at dawn and make it to Crater Lake by nightfall. Historically, the first residents were the Rogue River Takelma and Latgawa native Americans. Latgawa lived in the Rogue Valley of interior southwest Oregon. In their own language "Latgawa" means "those living in the “uplands," though they were also known as the Walumskni by the neighboring Klamath tribes. Specifically, Ha-ne-sakh. The Latgawa were one of two peoples who spoke the Takelma language. They were hunters, gatherers, weavers and fished the Rogue River. They were known to have a stationary settlement and trading post at the Katydid Ranch location. Their tribes lived in the upper Rogue River area extending beyond Prospect and Union up to Crater Lake. Since we've owned the Ranch, we've maintained the custom of welcoming overnight guests and at the same time, we continue to honor the protected wildlife designation given to it back in the 50's. Wildlife viewing is one the delights we share with our guests. Please be mindful of native wildlife keeping dogs on leash so as to avoid chasing and barking at wildlife. Thank you. The animals here include, but are not limited to black tail deer, elk, fox, coyote, ringtailed cat, raccoon, skunk, and also typically farther up the mountain are the elusive mountain lions and black bear which we have never spotted on our property. The ponds and surrounding area are home to migratory to the Oregon Pond turtle, Canada geese, quail, wild turkeys, various owls including the great horned owls, hawks, cranes and eagles. Our pond bird watcher friends spotted Common Mergansers, Ring Necked Ducks, Canada Geese…and a Loon. The bull frogs orchestrate the evening and can be heard at times throughout the day. Katydid Ranch is a wildlife sanctuary. The flora and fauna of the forest is abundant and diverse. This land is home to many native grasses, ferns, and berries, wild flowers, as well as many other edible and medicinal plants and numerous varieties of mushrooms. If you are visiting during blackberry season, feel free to pick, pick, pick and indulge. Katydid trees include old growth Douglas Fir, Ponderosa, Sugar, and Jeffrey Pine, various Cedar tree varieties, Incense Cedar, the majestic Pacific Madrone, Alder, Big Leaf Maple, Black and White Oak, Dog wood, and Vine Maple. You may also spot the prolific wild hazelnuts. As Forest Stewards, we are committed to maintaining a well balanced and diverse forest ecosystem.
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$45
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97%
(361)

Historic, Quiet Organic Farm

7 sites · Lodging, RVs, Tents21 acres · Salem, OR
GeerCrest Farm occupies Kalapuya land, settled by the Geer family in 1847, and is still owned and stewarded by the family. The house Ralph and Mary Geer built in 1851 stands and is one of the oldest in Oregon to remain in the same family. GeerCrest Farm and Historical Society manages the front portion of the land and has provided farm-life experiences for all ages since 2007, along with day and overnight experiences for individuals and families. Along with its history, the valley view, small creek and pond, farm animal, and diverse wildlife at GeerCrest is a truly unique experience. On the 20 acre property, we offer two tent camp sites, a tree house, as well as two woodland lodgings. Our peaceful, small farm offers a reflective immersion in nature and history among the occasional chatter of chickens and baaas of sheep. The scenery from all corners of the farm is incredible - a favorite is the westward view of the valley pasture at sunset -- called "Homer's View" after famous political cartoonist and Geer descendant, Homer Davenport. No matter which camping site you choose, the sounds of the creek, pond frogs, or conversing owls are sure to lull you to sleep. Please say hello to our flock of chickens, barn cats (they may say hello first) and small but mighty herd of sheep. Explore the Heritage Grove of historic trees, the Memorial apple orchard and pear glade with varieties cerca 1840s, indulge your senses in our medicinal herb garden, ponder the historic 1854 black cottonwood tree and chat with our farm family while they water the veggie gardens, if you so wish! Your experience will certainly be unique to the season. GeerCrest Farm is truly an off-the-beaten-path gem.
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$35
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100%
(115)

Batwater Station on Columbia River

10 sites · Lodging, RVs, Tents60 acres · Clatskanie, OR
Batwater Station is located halfway between Portland and the Oregon Coast on the Columbia River. A private refuge where river otter, beaver, mink, muskrat, seals, raccoons along with threatened Columbia river white tailed deer can be seen. Property has 1,000 feet of boat docks, river deck, and pier. At the pier is a full kitchen, heated bathroom and shower room. Included are 2 outhouses, a fire pit for summer months, a viewing station overlooking the wetlands along with brick charcoal fired barbecue and another propane barbecue. We are committed to your privacy so guests are limited and spread out. High speed internet through out the property. Batwater worked with several agencies when we breeched a levee and flooded 26 acres for salmon and wildlife habitat. Hike along the wetlands and see beaver dams and dens. Batwater is also home for many types of birds including eagles, osprey, tree swallow, purple martins, barn swallows, wood ducks, common and hooded mergansers, mallards, scoots, scaups, grebes, cormorants, great egrets, blue herons, geese and many types of song birds . In the spring and summer see our returning osprey who have. nested on our dock since 2013. There are now 2 osprey platform since a pair of Canada geese choose that as their nesting site as well. Some bald eagles winter here but we have our resident bald eagles Hep and Hope. They arrived in 2003 to start their nest on Crims Island. They still nest there although there old nest tree collapsed in 2020. Many birds migrate here for the winter. Common mammals are river otter, mink, muskrat, raccoons, nutria, coyotes, black tailed and threatened Colombia White Tailed deer. We also are home to native turtles and frogs. Batwater is a working farm with cattle feeding on lush pastures, 2 retired horses and chickens. When eggs are available, we will share some with you. Batwater is a great place to kayak, canoe, paddle board or row during the summer months. We have windy afternoons for windsurfers or sailors. The Columbia River is well known for salmon, and sturgeon. For an extra fee you can moor your larger boat while visiting. There are a volley ball and badminton set ups along with horse shoes during the summer months. We suggest swimming during the summer months when the tide is coming in or slack. You can also walk or drive down to Mayger beach which is popular with locals. There are sandy beaches on Crims island that you can paddle over too. Check out the pictures for more information.
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$40
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99%
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Far Away yet Tranquil and Close

15 sites · Lodging, RVs, Tents40 acres · Bandon, OR
Dew Valley Ranch Nature Retreat is a Private Membership Association. We promote a quiet relaxing get back to nature vibe to nurture your mind, body and soul. We specialize in private camping and unique glamping experiences. All our sites are on an acre or more of wooded land each. Each site also has a private potty. Giving you privacy unlike other campgrounds. Face Rock State Beach is a short 10 minute drive away. NO OUTSIDE PET/SERVICES ANIMALS. CHILDREN 12 OR OLDER ONLY.... We have farm animals to meet and trails to walk through the woods. There are games to play, a camp community garden, hot showers, and even a heated dish washing station. We are 10 minutes from the beautiful Bandon by the sea which offers: fun shopping, crabbing dock, world class golfing, Whiskey Run mountain biking trails, West Coast Game park, horseback riding on the beach, Circles in the Sand, restaurants and of course stunning beaches. Come and enjoy a peaceful and relaxing stay. We look forward to hosting you!
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$55
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(16)

Trillium Wilderness Retreat

53 sites · Lodging, RVs, Tents80 acres · Jacksonville, OR
This 80-acre property nestled along Birch Creek & the Little Applegate River is currently FOR SALE to pass forward to new stewards... maybe you! Please visit our website for more info: trilliumoregon(dot)com Trillium is a former wilderness community and retreat center tucked into a vast valley of the Siskiyou Mountains of Southern Oregon. From ridge-top to riverside, guest are immersed in pristine nature, breathtakingly fertile and rugged landscape. Over the past 40 years, Trillium has been a multi-faceted community, education & birthing center. The history of this place is vast, rich and honored. TRILLIUM’S FIRST COMMUNITY Prior to our purchase of the property in 2017, Trillium was home to a community since the 1970’s. This community was unique in that it sustained on its own functioning without a “guru,” which was popular of that time. Trillium birthed many babies along the hippie trail, as well as many entrepreneurial ventures. Most notable of these ventures was Unicorn Domes, now known as Pacific Domes located in neighboring Ashland, OR. GRANDMA’S TROUT FARM Chant, a founder of the Trillium’s first community, tells the story of coming upon the land while out on a camping trip. The story flows like a fairytale, having a sense of awe and deep resonance of home in this place. At that time, the land was home to a trout farm, and thus many holding ponds and water features were created in Birch Creek, meandering south through the valley to feed the Little Applegate River. Our office, Cedar Barn, was filled with tanks of small trout, while the waterwheel containing them still remains on the old barn you’ll see as you enter the parking lot. APPLE ORCHARD While we don’t know much about it, there is a story of 2 sisters and their apple orchard. As we continue to explore and rehabilitate the valley, we have discovered a variety of old legacy apple trees in unexpected places. These trees were likely displaced during one of the old floods through the valley, but have held on (sometimes to the edge of a slope) and continue to produce fruit…an inspiring example of the resilience of this land. NATIVES, CHINESE IMMIGRANTS & MINERS This part of the world is gold-mining land, and there are even still claims upriver today! As with any monetary venture, there is ingenuity as well as tests of integrity. The peaceful natives of this land, the Dakubetedes were all but obliterated, while Chinese immigrants were exploited for their engineering genius and labor to construct the 26.5 mile Sterling Mine Ditch. This ditch had a “clean out” that emptied through our valley, thus named “Muddy Gulch.” It’s deep ruts are still quite evident, both physically and energetically. We seek to learn and heal these parts of our history on this land.This description of the history, lightly touching on these atrocities, can be found on the BLM website: “Long before the appearance of European settlers, Sterling Creek and the Little Applegate River area were traditional homelands of the Dakubetede people. This group was also known as the Applegate Creek Indians and was part of the Rogue River Indians, a name applied to the people of the Upper Rogue River and its tributaries. The Dakubetedes utilized an abundance of berries, seeds, roots, fish, and game throughout the year to maintain a diverse diet. The Dakubetedes spoke a dialect of the Athabascan language group, unusual for the tribes in interior southwest Oregon. The Dakubetedes took part in the Rogue River Indian Treaties of 1853 and 1854 that resulted in their removal from their homelands to the Grand Ronde and Siletz Indian Reservations in northwest Oregon. When gold was discovered in 1854 on Sterling Creek, prospectors poured into the area. At first, they panned for gold along the creek, but this proved to be inefficient in extracting the gold that was buried under layers of rock and soil. Hydraulic mining, using a powerful jet of water, promised better returns for large scale mining; they just needed more water. In 1877 miners built the Sterling Mine Ditch to redirect water from the upper reaches of the Little Applegate River to the Sterling Creek Mine. The ditch followed the contours of the rugged slopes of Anderson Butte and lost only 200 feet in elevation over its 26.5 mile length. Using hand tools, up to 400 workers, most of them probably Chinese, completed the ditch in just 6 months, at a cost of $70,000. The ditch carried water to the mine, and the trail alongside it provided access for ditch maintenance. During peak operation, hydraulic mining on Sterling Creek blasted away up to 800 cubic yards of soil and rock each day. Impacts to fisheries and water quality were immense, and generations would pass before the hydrologic balance and fish habitat in Sterling Creek would recover. The mine discontinued operations in the 1930s, and the ditch and trail became overgrown with brush and trees. The Sterling Mine Ditch Trail (SMDT) is a marvel of late nineteenth century engineering. Be sure to see the tunnel, dug as a shortcut through the ridge at the top of the Tunnel Ridge access trail! You can also see old flume remnants while hiking along sections of the trail. As you drive along Sterling Creek Road, you can see piles of stones and boulders along the creek that were left by hydraulic mining as soil was washed away in the search for gold. In addition to gold, the layers of soil and rock also yielded bones and tusks of elephants and other ancient inhabitants of the area.” GLACIERS AND BIODIVERSITY The biodiversity of the natural world is immense in our PNW pocket, and especially at Trillium. This description, and more info, can be found on the World Wildlife website under ecoregion, “Klamath-Siskiyou.” “Biological DistinctivenessThe Klamath-Siskiyou ecoregion is considered a global center of biodiversity (Wallace 1982), an IUCN Area of Global Botanical Significance (1 of 7 in North America), and is proposed as a World Heritage Site and UNESCO Biosphere Reserve (Vance-Borland et al. 1995). The biodiversity of these rugged coastal mountains of northwestern California and southwestern Oregon has garnered this acclaim because the region harbors one of the four richest temperate coniferous forests in the world (along with the Southeastern Conifer forests of North America, forests of Sichuan, China, and the forests of the Primorye region of the Russian Far East), with complex biogeographic patterns, high endemism, and unusual community assemblages. A variety of factors contribute to the region’s extraordinary living wealth. The region escaped extensive glaciation during recent ice ages, providing both a refuge for numerous taxa and long periods of relatively favorable conditions for species to adapt to specialized conditions. Shifts in climate over time have helped make this ecoregion a junction and transition zone for several major biotas, namely those of the Great Basin, the Oregon Coast Range, the Cascades Range, the Sierra Nevada, the California Central Valley, and Coastal Province of Northern California. Elements from all of these zones are currently present in the ecoregion’s communities. Temperate conifer tree species richness reaches a global maximum in the Klamath-Siskiyous with 30 species, including 7 endemics, and alpha diversity (single-site) measured at 17 species within a single square mile (2.59 km2) at one locality (Vance-Borland et al. 1995). Overall, around 3,500 plant species are known from the region, with many habitat specialists (including 90 serpentine specialists) and local endemics. The great heterogeneity of the region’s biodiversity is due to the area’s rugged terrain, very complex geology and soils (giving the region the name "the Klamath Knot"), and strong gradients in moisture decreasing away from the coast (e.g., more than300 cm (120in)/annum to less than 50 cm (20 in)/annum). Habitats are varied and range from wet coastal temperate rainforests to moist inland forests dominated by Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), Pinus ponderosa, and P. lambertiana mixed with a variety of other conifers and hardwoods (e.g., Chamaecyparis lawsoniana, Lithocarpus densiflora, Taxus brevifolia, and Quercus chrysolepis); drier oak forests and savannas with Quercus garryana and Q. kelloggii; serpentine formations with well-developed sclerophyllous shrubs; higher elevation forests with Douglas fir, Tsuga mertensiana, Abies concolor and A. magnifica; alpine grasslands on the higher peaks; and cranberry and pitcher plant bogs. Many species and communities have adapted to very narrow bands of environmental conditions or to very specific soils such as serpentine outcrops. Local endemism is quite pronounced with numerous species restricted to single mountains, watersheds, or even single habitat patches, tributary streambanks, or springs (e.g., herbaceous plants, salamanders, carabid beetles, land snails, see Olson 1991). Such fine-grained and complex distribution patterns means that any losses of native forests or habitats in this ecoregion can significantly contribute to species extinction. Several of the only known localities for endemic harvestman, spiders, land snails, and other invertebrates have been heavily altered or lost through logging within the last decade, and the current status of these species is unknown (Olson 1991). Unfortunately, many invertebrate species with distribution patterns and habitat preferences that make them prone to extinction, such as old growth specialist species, are rarely recognized or listed as federal endangered species. Indeed, 83 species of Pacific Northwest freshwater mussels and land snails with extensive documentation of their endangerment were denied federal listing by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1994 (J. Belsky, pers. comm. 1994).Rivers and streams of the Klamath-Siskiyou region support a distinctive fish fauna, including nine species of native salmonids (salmon and trout), and several endemic or near-endemic species such as the tui chub (Gila bicolor), the Klamath small-scale sucker (Catostomus rimiculus), and the coastrange sculpin (Cottus aleuticus). Many unusual aquatic invertebrates are also occur in the region.” For more information about our community, reserving the whole property, or any other questions, please visit the TrilliumOregon website or find us on instagram @trilliumoregon
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$25
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Camp Colton

19 sites · Lodging, RVs, Tents85 acres · Colton, OR
One of rural Oregon's hidden gems, Camp Colton is a retreat and event center tucked away on 85 acres of forest about an hour Southeast of Portland. Enjoy hiking our trails, walking our creeks and swimming or canoeing in our creek-fed pond. This is a truly special setting to unplug and relax. Our listings offer something for everyone, including tent camping, RV sites, a tiny house, forest yurt and a cottage that sleeps up to six! All of our listings are pet friendly and allow campfires (burn ban permitting). Amenities for each listing vary from bare-bones to full kitchen and bath, so be sure to read each description carefully and choose according to your needs. ****PLEASE NOTE: IN ADDITION TO OUR ACCOMMODATIONS, WE ARE A WEDDING AND EVENT VENUE, SO YOU MAY HEAR MUSIC AND JOYFUL VOICES ACROSS THE CREEK LATE INTO THE EVENING DURING OUR PEAK SEASON (ROUGHLY MAY 1 - OCTOBER 31). If you prefer only to stay when there is no event on our large site, please inquire before requesting to book. Our guests love staying with us! Check out these comments from past guests: "This place was absolutely amazing! We cannot wait to come back!" "The host thought of everything - every little touch and comfort to make it feel so cozy and glamping-perfect." "The fire pit and chairs outside were excellent, and the stove inside kept it so cozy and warm in there. Plenty of firewood, lighter, blankets, water & lights - we wanted for nothing!" "It felt very remote and we could hear the water all night, but it’s actually not remote and so we appreciated that the camp was gated at night." "Such a great place!! We are going to recommend it to all our friends and can’t wait to get back. Thanks to Neal for being an excellent host when we arrived!!"
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$60
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Justesen Ranches

17 sites · Lodging, RVs, TentsTygh Valley, OR
Justesen Ranches is family owned working cattle, wheat and recreation ranch . Our properties are located in the Columbia River Plateau in North Central Oregon. Enjoy wide open spaces, reservoirs for wildlife watching and clear night skies for star gazing. This is a leave no trace, pack it in, pack it out camping area.The property is located in Tygh Valley and is only a few minutes from the general store and the stunning White River Falls State Park. The Deschutes River whitewater rafting hub of Maupin is just a 10 minute drive away. The lodge two hours from Portland and 30 min from The Dalles.
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$85
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Yale Creek Ranch

8 sites · Lodging44 acres · Jacksonville, OR
Located in the beautiful Applegate Valley, Yale Creek Ranch seeks to create a beneficial and respectful environment for visitors to have meaningful experiences. There are six cabins and one dome and a main house on the property, which gives the ranch has a community feel while being spacious enough to provide privacy.  The ranch is a great place to relax because of the beautiful landscape, lack of internet and cell service, and comfy lodgings.    There are also many things to do in the nearby area, including visiting excellent wineries or hiking the Sterling ditch mine trail.  For outdoor enthusiasts, there is Mt. Ashland for mountain biking, and the Rogue River for boating. Despite having the feeling of being away from city life, Ashland is only 45 minutes away. Popular things to do in the city include the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, or spending time in Lithia Park.  Despite having the feeling of being away from city life, Ashland is only 45 minutes away. Popular things to do in the city include the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, or spending time in Lithia Park. 
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$100
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98%
(486)

Tillamook - Trask River

3 sites · Lodging, RVs, Tents52 acres · Tillamook, OR
Welcome to a premier Texas Longhorn ranch where you will be staying right next to the Trask River with access to fishing, boating and kayaking. If you are needing a little sensory-deprivation from everyday life. You have found it!! We invite you to experience a relaxing, calming atmosphere on the riverbank of the Trask River. Pitch your tent or bring your RV and embrace mother nature. Please contact me by phone 503-812-0630, as you can see we have closed our sites. However, i'm willing to work with folks around time frames. Thank you, Carmen
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$50
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River, stream, or creek cabins in Oregon guide

Overview

Camping in Oregon is a true escape to nature. Hipcamp offers over 270 options for those seeking a cabin near a river. Cedar Bloom, with 1299 reviews, is one of the top campsites for this combo. Prices range from $40 to $187 per night. Far Away yet Tranquil and Close and Tillamook are also popular options. Trash, pets, and toilets are popular amenities, while climbing, swimming, and wildlife watching are among the most common activities.

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