Leo Carrillo State Park

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About Leo Carrillo State Park

Nestled against the SoCal coast in the Santa Monica Mountains, Leo Carrillo State Park offers 1.5 miles of pure beach perfection. Let’s assume you aren’t going to just melt into that SoCal sun and actually do something active, with activities ranging from windsurfing to hiking to beachcombing, all available for the adventurer of all types. Venturing inwards, backcountry trails allow for some serene and panoramic jaunts among the beautiful giant sycamores that shade the campground.

Campgrounds in Leo Carrillo

Canyon Campground
Anna
Anna: Great place to take a break - not exactly super secluded, but a short drive from LA and the tide pools...

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Leo Carrillo
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October 17th, 2015
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June 5th, 2015
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May 14th, 2015
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August 15th, 2015
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13 Reviews
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Hipcamper Anna

Great place to take a break - not exactly super secluded, but a short drive from LA and the tide pools were filled with incredibly cool purple sea slugs and hermit crabs!

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Hipcamper Ivan

A short drive from LA. I work at thousand oaks so it's not bad going after work. Avoid walk-in's on high temp weathers because that place will book quickly. I know "amateur" right? This place is very calming and plenty of space for day use.

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Hipcamper Amanda

The campsite can be a little bit cramped; however, there's one spot at the end of the cul de sac as you drive in that offers extra space if you can snag it!

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Hipcamper Peter

One of my favorite easy trips with family and friends. Must book 6 months ahead in season, unless there is an unlikely cancellation. Rare, but I have been lucky enough to get a few this way by showing up early and asking the ranger.

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Hipcamper Hipcamper
Hipcamper

We recommend site 139 if you can get it.

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Hipcamper Kamilah

Pretty cool site to get away from the city and have a 2-fer beach day. The $60 sites are powered.
Was able to get a site as a walk up.
NOT secluded. Lots of families and kids and the campsites abut each other.
Walking distance to dog friendly beach is a plus.

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Hipcamper Hipcamper
Hipcamper

Leo Carrillo is very popular (with reason), make sure to book far in advance!

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Hipcamper Hipcamper
Hipcamper

Totally dog friendly, so bring your four-legged best friend without any hesitation.

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Hipcamper Hipcamper
Hipcamper

There’s a great campground store which covers most of your normal needs, so it’s OK if you forget a little something.

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Hipcamper

Watch out for the classic rattlers and poison oak along the trail, but you should be fine as long as you keep an eye peeled

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Hipcamper

There are a lot of spigots...a lot...so yah...there’s a lot of faucets...stay hydrated people!

Hipcamper Stacie

Great week night camp site. Leo Carillo has one of the few dog friendly beaches in Los Angeles County. The creek is home to endangered steelhead so keep your dog and fishing poles OUT. If you play in the creek don't build rock walls as they can prevent fish from accessing the creek.

Hipcamper Stephanie

Camping neighbors can be loud and messy with the bathrooms.

History of Leo Carrillo State Park

Archaeologists believe that the Chumash people, superb artisans who excelled at basketry and elaborate rock art, lived in the area as long ago as 6,000 B.C.E. They enjoyed playing games, singing, dancing and trading with other tribes. Their plank boats carried them to the Channel Islands to trade, fish and gather mussels and abalone. In the late 1700s, Spaniards settled the area, forcing dramatic changes on the Chumash and their way of life. Native American labor built Mission San Buenaventura, but the regimented mission life and the effects of European diseases took a toll on the Chumash. After inhabiting this land for thousands of years, they had nearly disappeared by 1920. Today many Chumash descendants still celebrate and share their vibrant cultural traditions.

Leo Carrillo State Park is named after a star of Broadway, television and film. Descended from prominent early California families—his great-grandfather was Carlos Antonio de Jesus Carrillo, a governor of California in the last years of Mexican rule—Mr. Carrillo’s talent lay in entertainment. He began as a vaudeville comedian; his prolific film career lasted from the late 1920s well into the 1960s. One of his more recognizable roles was the comic sidekick in the television series “The Cisco Kid.” Leo Carrillo served 14 years on the State Beaches and Parks Commission; he was instrumental in the state’s acquisition of much of the property between Malibu Lagoon and Point Mugu, including the area named after him.