Morro Bay State Park

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About Morro Bay State Park

“Whoa what is that massive awesome rock jutting out of the Pacific?” “Oh you mean Morro Rock, the 23 million year old volcanic plug that overlooks Morro Bay and hundreds of different species?” That’s some of the normal conversation that ensues after seeing the magnificent Morro Rock on a drive along Highway 1 in the Central Californian coast. Morro Bay State Park covers 2,700 acres and offers incredible opportunities for camping, boating, and hiking, along the calm waters of the Morro Bay. The park contains the Morro Bay State Park Museum of Natural History, Morro Rock Natural Preserve, the Heron Rookery Natural Preserve, and the highly acclaimed Morro Bay State Park Golf Course. Home to an incredible amount of marine and land species, Morro Bay State Park is an amazing stop along the Californian coast and warrants some serious seaside and marshy appreciation.

Campgrounds in Morro Bay

Morro Bay Campground

1. Morro Bay Campground

93% Recommend (14 Responses)

Morro Bay State Park campground consists of 135 sites shaded by a mixed forest planted by the CCC in the 1930’s. This does not cause for much shade...

Pierre
Pierre: We had a surprisingly good time there. The campground doesn't offer anything special other than appreciable and cheap showers –...
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Hipcamper Corina Rose

a humble yet beautiful campground, nestled just next to -- and on level with -- a gorgeous natural estuary preserve. hikes, walks and biking trails surround the place, with beautiful hills behind to climb and get a view of it all. a central coast gem!

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Hipcamper Pierre

We had a surprisingly good time there. The campground doesn't offer anything special other than appreciable and cheap showers – a quarter dollar is enough – but this is a nice area. Check out the bay at sunset! You can rent kayaks at the marina, in front of the Bayside Café.

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Hipcamper Jordan

This was the first place I ever camped.

It's not very secluded at all, it's only a short 10 minute walk into town which isn't really my preference. The campsite itself is pretty nice. There are some nice hikes available and the air is nice and crisp in the mornings. The campsites themselves were kind of hard to distinguish between, can't really tell where one begins and the other ends, but that could've been a rookie mistake made by me.

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Hipcamper A
A

Otters are adorable. Make sure to head out on the bay in a kayak and experience families of otters and other species gliding along the water; it’s a magical experience.

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Hipcamper A
A

Black Hill offers a great easy hike with a final view that’s worth a trek 10x the distance. This comes very highly recommended, and a common activity among locals is to stay on the hill for the sunset.

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Hipcamper A
A

Head into town and enjoy what Morro Bay is known for: the seafood!

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Hipcamper A
A

Check out the Museum of Natural History to gain some perspective on the area. It’s fun for all ages, with activities ranging from nature walks, to lectures, to puppet shows, and to the Chumash garden where you can learn how Native Americans used the regional plants in their daily lives.

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Hipcamper Shirtless host Steve

Report from your shirtless host on Morro Bay State Park.
I have coming to Morro Bay for about 50 years now. I have climb to the top many times years ago.
The State Park is run down, the winter has took its toll. And thats being nice.
The price is a little high. $50. For just water & Elec. And $35. For dry camping-just to have a cold or Luke warm showers. B\Rs were dirty all day most of the time. The showers were dirty and hair in them every I check. And checked 5 Times all 3 days I was there. No TP. In 2 of the B\Rs. 2 days in a row. Staff was not to friendly at all. Host were great.
This is a pristine area, it has Bird watching, Hiking trails and much much more.
I think every one should camp at a S.P.
Shirtless host Steve

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Hipcamper Shirtless host Steve

Report from your shirtless host @ Morro Bay S.P. on a 1955 Kenskill Trailer.
This is about a 1955 14' Kenskill. What a gem.
The classic was found in a shed. ? It was under cover for the past 30+ years just setting there.
The the new owners are Jim & Dina ( 3rd. owners they think ) that told me that they were looking for a trailer for about a year or so. What a gem they found. Every in side worked like new ( with a little cleaning up ) after setting for 30 years. This classic is being tow by a red custom GMC subauan
They had it painted about 3 years ago. So if you see it heading or coming from the coast back to Bakersfield give them a hook.
They put another classic on the road
Shirtless host Steve
Shirtlesshost.blogspot.co

Hipcamper Kristi

essentially a parking lot, but right at the beach.

History of Morro Bay State Park

For many millennia before European contact, ancestors of the people who today call themselves Chumash or Salinan lived on the central coast. The first European overland expedition
into the Morro Bay area was led by Don Gaspar de Portolá in 1769. The first American to settle in the area was Franklin Riley, who laid out streets and lots for a town he called “Morro” (meaning nose or headland). Year-round mild weather made Morro Bay a popular tourist destination beginning in the 1890s.

The Cabrillo Country Club had opened on the present state park site a few months
before the crash of the 1920’s. The club’s developers desperately sought a buyer, and the town of Morro Bay pushed for the state to acquire the land as a state park. The state
took possession of the property in 1934. As one of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal programs, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) created work for unemployed young men. The CCC arrived in Morro Bay State Park on May 11, 1934, to begin transforming the former country club into a state park. The many finely crafted stone features that are seen in the park today were built by the CCC. Morro Bay State Park looks out over the bay to wind-sculpted sand dunes. Guarding the harbor entrance of the central coast’s Morro Bay, Morro Rock has been a landmark for mariners over the centuries.