Anastasia State Park

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About Anastasia State Park

Tree hammocks or a hammock of trees? That is the question. You’re likely to find both when you visit this 1,600 acre former coquina (softshell) quarry on Florida’s northeastern Atlantic Coast - where much of the rock was used to erect the nearby fortress Castillo de San Marcos. The four miles of beach are ideal for taking in the sand dunes and salt marshes while walking, jogging, angling, wind sailing, birding, boating, swimming or any of the other numerous activities offered at Anastasia State Park. Having trouble falling asleep? Anastasia’s Bedtime Story Camper Library offers picture books for young campers which will help ease the passage to peaceful dreamspace. And just so we are all on the same page… Tree hammocks: A comfortable resting sling connected at two points, often accompanied by sunny beach, gentle breeze, deep relaxation and a frozen beverage Hammock of trees: An ecological collective formation of hardwood trees that grow together in elevated groupings just above wetland marshes that give an “island-like” appearance

Campgrounds in Anastasia

Anastasia State Park Campground

1. Anastasia State Park Campground

100% Recommend (4 Responses)

Among the thick underbrush and mangroves, you’ll feel like the king (or queen) of the jungle at this hammock-forested campground. Offering...

Emily
Emily: Anastasia State Park is an amazing campground. I'd place it among the best I've been to. The sites are dry and sandy, no...
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Anastasia
hipcamper
June 5th, 2015
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hipcamper
June 5th, 2015
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June 5th, 2015
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July 21st, 2015
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1 Review

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Hipcamper Emily

Anastasia State Park is an amazing campground. I'd place it among the best I've been to. The sites are dry and sandy, no Florida swamp yuck and thus not so many mosquitoes (but there are no see-ums at night). All of them have shade and are surrounded by a ring of greenery for your privacy. The also have personal water spigots, that's something you don't see to often. The beach is beautiful and uncrowded. The waves can be a bit rough.

You will be within a few minutes drive of many fine restaurants. There was also a funky cheap taco cart at the park entrance when I stayed there. I recommend going to the mainland to get a hyppo pop (gourmet popsicle that comes in good flavors like peach bourbon), and dining at the Floridian restaurant.

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History of Anastasia State Park

More than 300 years ago, sites like the coquina
quarries locMore than 300 years ago, sites like the coquina
quarries located within Anastasia State Park were
busy with workers, mostly Native Americans,
hauling out blocks of rock. By the late 1700s,
the Native American population had died out
and quarry workers were usually enslaved Africans
and captured Europeans. With hand tools, they
hewed out blocks of the soft shellstone and pried
the squares loose along natural layers in the
rock. The blocks were loaded onto ox-drawn
carts then barged across Matanzas Bay to the
town of St. Augustine. The blocks were used to
construct the Castillo de San Marcos and many
other buildings.
From its founding in 1565, St. Augustine had been
a struggling outpost of Spain’s American empire.
Spanish soldiers built their fort and their homes
out of the plentiful pine trees and palmetto. Time
after time their wooden settlement was destroyed
by storms or burned by pirates and other raiders.
On Anastasia Island the Spaniards discovered
a better building material—deposits of a rock
made of broken shells. As early as 1598, they dug
enough to build a gunpowder storage magazine,
but they lacked the workforce, the engineering
skills and the tools to excavate enough for a
large structure.
In 1671 large-scale quarrying began in the
stone pits. Coquina rock is relatively soft and
easy to cut while in the ground and hardens when
exposed to air. The Spanish learned to waterproof
the stone walls by coating them with plaster
and paint. When besieging ships bombarded the
Castillo, the walls simply absorbed the cannon
balls. Coquina continued to be a prized building
material for the Spanish, British (1763-83) and the
Americans (1821).
ated within Anastasia State Park were
busy with workers, mostly Native Americans,
hauling out blocks of rock. By the late 1700s,
the Native American population had died out
and quarry workers were usually enslaved Africans
and captured Europeans. With hand tools, they
hewed out blocks of the soft shellstone and pried
the squares loose along natural layers in the
rock. The blocks were loaded onto ox-drawn
carts then barged across Matanzas Bay to the
town of St. Augustine. The blocks were used to
construct the Castillo de San Marcos and many
other buildings.
From its founding in 1565, St. Augustine had been
a struggling outpost of Spain’s American empire.
Spanish soldiers built their fort and their homes
out of the plentiful pine trees and palmetto. Time
after time their wooden settlement was destroyed
by storms or burned by pirates and other raiders.
On Anastasia Island the Spaniards discovered
a better building material—deposits of a rock
made of broken shells. As early as 1598, they dug
enough to build a gunpowder storage magazine,
but they lacked the workforce, the engineering
skills and the tools to excavate enough for a
large structure.
In 1671 large-scale quarrying began in the
stone pits. Coquina rock is relatively soft and
easy to cut while in the ground and hardens when
exposed to air. The Spanish learned to waterproof
the stone walls by coating them with plaster
and paint. When besieging ships bombarded the
Castillo, the walls simply absorbed the cannon
balls. Coquina continued to be a prized building
material for the Spanish, British (1763-83) and the
Americans (1821).