Humboldt Redwoods State Park

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About Humboldt Redwoods State Park

Here’s the thing about this park: it’s home to the tallest trees in the world. As in, on this planet. Reaching more than 300 feet to the sky, they dwarf their surroundings, and are inherently impossible to describe. In fact, when asked about redwoods, California native John Steinbeck once said, “No one has ever successfully painted or photographed a redwood tree...The feeling they produce is not transferable. From them comes silence and awe. It's not only their unbelievable stature, nor the color which seems to shift and vary under your eyes, no, they are not like any trees we know, they are ambassadors from another time.” If you aren’t sure exactly what he means, you will understand once you make a visit to Humboldt Redwoods State Park, which spans nearly 53,000 acres with more than 17,000 untouched old-growth coast redwoods. Miles of meandering hiking trails and campsites set in the lush woods provide endless opportunities to wander through and discover the ancient groves, which are home to trees more than 2,000 years old. One of the best places to experience the redwoods, this is definitely a do-not-miss California camping spot.

Campgrounds in Humboldt Redwoods

Burlington Campground

1. Burlington Campground

Slightly larger than Albee Creek with 57 sites, this campground is located next to the visitor’s center and is in a grove of second growth...

Ross
Ross: Convenient base on Avenue of the Giants, but is used by many RVs. Also, wetter than the SF bay area, so be prepared.
31 Saves
Hidden Springs Campground

2. Hidden Springs Campground

Another summer spot, this campground is generally open mid-April through Labor Day. Located just south of the visitor’s center on the Avenue of the...

marley
Marley: had a great time hiking and swimming here! campsites are very private for as many as there were! Had more then enough space to...
17 Saves
Albee Creek Campground

3. Albee Creek Campground

Really a summertime campground spot, open from Memorial Day through October, this campground is located 5 miles west of the Avenue of the Giants....

Julian
Julian: Albee Creek is about 5miles up on Mattole Road: filled with ruts and potholes, so it seems like you're heading somewhere...
14 Saves
Marin Garden Club Group Camp

4. Marin Garden Club Group Camp

Smaller than its fellow group campground, William’s Grove, Marin Garden Club has room for 40 people, and is nestled in a redwood grove. It is...

7 Saves
Hamilton Barn Environmental Camp

5. Hamilton Barn Environmental Camp

Also open from April to October, Hamilton Barn is the one of two environmental campgrounds in the park (Baxter being the second). These sites are...

Jennifer
Jennifer: Super secluded. Had the entire campground to ourselves. Not a popular spot for families, HUGE plus for us! Went in July. Warm...
6 Saves
Williams Grove Group Camp

6. Williams Grove Group Camp

William’s Grove has two group sites for 40 and 60 people, respectively, open mid-May through September, which can be combined for large parties....

4 Saves
Baxter Environmental Camp

7. Baxter Environmental Camp

Like its sister site, Hamilton Barn Environmental, Baxter is open Memorial Day through Labor Day, and is a hike-and-bike in site that offers a more...

3 Saves
Cuneo Creek Campground

8. Cuneo Creek Campground

Equestrians, this is the spot for you. This campground is reserved for visitors who bring their horses to ride in the park, and includes two...

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Humboldt Redwoods
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September 5th, 2015
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September 5th, 2015
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April 8th, 2015
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10 Reviews

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Hipcamper Jennifer

Super secluded. Had the entire campground to ourselves. Not a popular spot for families, HUGE plus for us! Went in July. Warm days, cool nights. Sun-ripened blackberries everywhere! Even saw a bear eating apples in a tree (near campsite 5). Rec: Campsite 4.

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Hipcamper A
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It seems like old news, but trust us, the visitor’s center is absolutely worth a visit.

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Hipcamper A
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Mosquitoes love the damp ground and shade, so be sure to remember insect repellant.

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Hipcamper A
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Word on the street is that the wood you can buy at the park is redwood and difficult to light, so it might be a good idea to bring your own.

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Hipcamper A
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Go to Avenue of the Giants and stare in awe. It's ok...go ahead and take that cliché photo of you standing next to it.

Hipcamper Ross

Convenient base on Avenue of the Giants, but is used by many RVs. Also, wetter than the SF bay area, so be prepared.

Hipcamper Julian

Albee Creek is about 5miles up on Mattole Road: filled with ruts and potholes, so it seems like you're heading somewhere less-than-awesome. But the campground is a great destination, and you'll be greeted with a campground host if you arrive before 8-10pm. Try to arrive before sunset. The sites are underneath redwood trees and overlook a huge open field with tall mountains in the background. The bathrooms/showers are well maintained and heated when it gets cold overnight. About .5 miles back down the road towards Hwy 101 is 'Big Trees' area where you can see some enormous redwoods. Worth the short walk or at least stopping by before you head off. A beautiful campground where everyone seems to be having a great time.

Hipcamper marley

had a great time hiking and swimming here! campsites are very private for as many as there were! Had more then enough space to hang up a hammock and relax after a long day!

Hipcamper Christina

Stayed at site 25 for a couple nights. Lots of RVs and right by the road, but there was surprisingly little traffic and it wasn't too loud overnight. Right in the middle of Avenue of the Giants, close to Founders Grove and next to the main visitors center with an exhibit and lots of maps and helpful advice. I took my dog who was allowed in the site but not on any of the adjacent hiking trails. Worth stopping in Miranda for groceries, not too much in the smaller towns and Weott and Myers Flat

Hipcamper Sully

The quietest campground I've ever been in, though admittedly, it was February and rather rainy. So atmospheric in and amongst nature's cathedrals, just spectacular. The whole campground is very shady nestled amongst the redwoods which makes it deliciously cool in summer but a little chilly in winter.

History of Humboldt Redwoods State Park

The Sinkyone people lived in the area of Humboldt Redwoods State Park’s southern region for thousands of years before European contact. The boundaries of Sinkyone lands extended east to the main stem of the Eel River and the river’s South Fork, south beyond today’s town of Leggett, and west to the ocean.

The name Sinkyone was assigned by 20th- century ethnographers to classify separate political groups who spoke the same dialect of the Athabascan language family. Each distinct political group maintained its own geographic area and self- identity, but all groups formed a larger economy that delivered goods as far as the Eastern United States.

This area was likely more densely populated before European incursion than it
is now. Today more than ten percent of the population of Humboldt County are Native American, including many people of Sinkyone descent who live along the north coast.

The traditional practices passed down through generations of Sinkyone experience created a highly productive environment. Conservation and restoration projects headed by local tribal groups, using time- tested methods, have been instrumental in bringing healing to the landscape.


Beginning in the 1850s, European settlers in the area began to cut large
stands of redwood trees to clear the land for pastures and farms. Lumber soon became a vital industry, and forested land suddenly increased in value. Many people, however, believed that the huge old redwood trees were inherently significant and should be held in perpetual trust. In 1918, the Save the Redwoods League was formed to accomplish what their name implies—the salvation of one of the world’s great wonders. Thanks to the League and its supporters, more than 189,000 acres of California’s redwood forest lands have been preserved for future generations of park visitors to enjoy.