Everglades National Park

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About Everglades National Park

When a lot of people think of the Everglades they think of swampland teeming with insects and reptiles slinking through mud and seagrass. That’s part of it, sure--but did you know it’s technically a river? It flows (or rather, drifts) southwest at about a quarter mile a day, feeding a vast network of wetlands and forests on its way into the Florida Bay. It’s an immensely important ecosystem with nine distinct habitats housing hundreds of species of animals--dozens of them on the federally endangered list and some found nowhere else on the planet. The Everglades National Park spans 1.5 million acres, but actually only protects the southern 20% of the original Everglades. It’s one of only three places in the world that’s been declared a World Heritage Site, a Wetland of International Importance, and an International Biosphere Reserve. Human activity, changing climate conditions, and nonnative species (you’ve heard about the rampant Burmese python population, right?) have greatly impacted this complex ecosystem in a constant state of flux. One million people visit the Everglades every year, engaging in activities from biking and birdwatching to fishing and boating… and course, to marvel at the wonder of this magnificent changing force.

Campgrounds in Everglades

Flamingo Campground

1. Flamingo Campground

75% Recommend (4 Responses)

Flamingo Campground is on the southernmost tip of mainland Florida, jutting up to the Florida Bay with the Gulf of Mexico shimmering right on the...

Alexander
Alexander: Bug spray. The nastiest most chemical filled one you can find. And soak in it. Helps a little. I know it's not always this...
9 Saves
Long Pine Key Campground

2. Long Pine Key Campground

This spacious and well-maintained campground is located seven miles from the Everglades National Park entrance. The park is open seasonally from...

Cindy
Cindy: 2016 UPDATE: Showers are now being built at Long Pine Key Campground! Hallelujah! Although there are no hookups for RVs, there...
7 Saves
Long Pine Key Group Campground

3. Long Pine Key Group Campground

Located seven miles from the Everglades National Park entrance, Long Pine Key campground is a tranquil and well-maintained facility open seasonally...

2 Saves

4 Reviews

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Hipcamper Cindy

2016 UPDATE: Showers are now being built at Long Pine Key Campground! Hallelujah! Although there are no hookups for RVs, there is a dump station with water as you exit. I love this campground for its privacy and solitude. The mosquitoes are always a problem, less so in the winter months of course, and also gators if you venture near the pond. We also had a Cottonmouth snake visit our campsite last time we stayed. Just be careful, watchful, and prepared. Enjoy the silence and have fun!

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Hipcamper Alexander

Bug spray. The nastiest most chemical filled one you can find. And soak in it. Helps a little. I know it's not always this bad but the last time was unbearable.

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Hipcamper Cindy

During the winter months, Flamingo is packed to the gills. Only a handful of the RV sites have electrical hookups, there is no water or sewer hookup, but there is a dump station which provides water as well. During the summer months, the mosquito population is unbearable. Bring heavy outer clothing to put over regular clothes including head cover - yes, it is THAT bad. Also, many of the electrical outlets are turned off in summer - you may find 2 or 3 that actually work. Despite all that, Flamingo is my getaway - with my dogs - for holiday like 4th of July (no fireworks!). Primitive, but peaceful.

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History of Everglades National Park

Although known for its vast natural landscapes, the Everglades have been home and hunting grounds for many people and groups. Since the emergence of the River of Grass, Native Americans and later on Anglo-American settlers known as “Gladesmen” traversed the wild landscape and came to rely on its abundant natural resources, and explore its mysteries. Developers would make their mark on the land in a different way, by seeking to alter the wetland landscape by draining the land and building roads and canals. In response to the rapid alterations which were affecting the Everglades, Conservation groups like the Florida Federation of Women’s Clubs pioneered efforts to reclaim and save the “River of Grass” from further development.