Cabins near Townsville

Explore a tropical city on the doorstep of the Great Barrier Reef to camp in lush national parks.

100% (1 reviews)
100% (1 reviews)

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2 top cabins sites near Townsville

Booked 2 times

Alva Beach Tourist Park

62 sites · Lodging, RVs, Tents5 acres · Alva, QLD
A friendly welcome to Alva Beach Tourist Park tucked away in the small coastal village of Alva and just a 15km drive from the town of Ayr and Burdekin Shire. We are located a few hundred meters at the back of the dunes of the beach. The park consists of 5 acres of tropical grounds with park sites and cabins set amongst coconut palms and hibiscus hedges. We offer powered and non-powered sites with or without slabs. We have En-suite Cabins that can sleep up to six persons or budget cabins that will sleep up to 4 persons. Our park being coastal catches the great cooling sea breezes during the hotter summer months and our sparkling pool is a great spot to soak up the sun and cool off with a few laps. We have 4WD access from the park onto the beach for boat launching, fishing, and crabbing. The region is a well-known fishing mecca, with access to Barramundi, mud crabs, other estuary species, and off-coast reef fishing. Alva is also the closest point to the world-famous SS Yongala wreck. Ranked as one of the top ten dive sites in the world.
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Potable water
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from 
AU$45
 / night
* Before taxes and fees
100%
(1)

Magnetic Naturally Island Cabin

1 site · Lodging1 acre · QLD
Our island cabin is purpose built for guests and is fully self contained. Comfortable queen bed, lounge, kitchen, bathroom with a beautiful under cover outdoor shower, fans, air-conditioning and washing machine. There is a covered deck attached to cabin and a paved area to relax in by outdoor BBQ. Large outdoor pool for your use, in a shared area with the owners. The cabin is very private, surrounded by native flora and fauna and growing gardens. The cabin is completely separate to our family home. It is a truely peaceful spot with the beach less than a kilometre away. Horseshoe Bay is the gateway to many of our beautiful bays and tracks including the famous Forts walk. There are water activities and a life guard patrolled swim area. Several little cafes restaurants and a local pub are also in the bay. There is a great bus service on the island and nearest bus stop is less than 2 km away. Rental cars are also available at good rates.
Potable water
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Cooking equipment
from 
AU$300
 / night
* Before taxes and fees
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Value Prop

Cabins near Townsville guide

Overview

Against the backdrop of the dramatic Castle Hill, Townsville is a tropical city with a strong military history and great diving opportunities on the Great Barrier Reef. The Strand is Townsville’s waterfront promenade, lined with cafes and restaurants and popular for its water park, playgrounds and swimming pools. Among the city’s major attractions is Jezzine Barracks, a parkland dotted with outdoor sculptures and memorials honoring the city’s wartime history and the American forces who served here in World War II, but outside of town, caravan parks and campgrounds await. Cruises depart from Townsville harbor for the Great Barrier Reef, about 2.5 hours away. Experienced divers can also tackle the Yongala shipwreck.

Where to go

Magnetic Island

Take a day trip—or longer—to Magnetic Island, just five miles offshore. an hour’s ferry ride from Townsville. Much of the island is National Park (where camping is banned) and there are plenty of beautiful bays to snorkel, swim or tackle various watersports. A highlight is koala-spotting along the Forts Walk, which features ruins of World War II fortification.

Charters Towers

Charters Towers is a charming Outback town with a fascinating gold mining history, about 90 minutes’ drive west of Townsville. Among its attractions is the Venus Gold Battery, the largest surviving battery in Australia, and some elegant and impressive colonial buildings. There are two large camping and caravan parks in town.

Paluma Range National Park

Jourama Falls is the highlight of a visit to Paluma Range National Park, about 90 minutes’ drive northwest of Townsville. There is a popular camping area at Jourama Falls on the banks of Waterview Creek, walking tracks and day-use facilities including picnic tables, barbecues and toilets.

When to go

Claiming more than 300 days of sunshine a year, Townsville’s average temperature is 28°F. The best time to visit is April to November. Summers (December to February) are hot, humid and sticky, and marine stingers inhabit coastal waters from November to April, when it is best to swim in netted zones or wear a “stinger suit.” Summer is also a time when Townsville can sometimes be in the path of cyclones.

Know before you go

  • Remember to pack sunscreen; the tropical Queensland sun can be fierce. If you are heading to the Great Barrier Reef, check out sunscreens that won’t damage the coral reefs (those that don’t contain oxybenzone or BP-3).
  • Camping permits are required for all Queensland parks, forest and reserves and must be booked online and paid for before arrival. Make camping books as early as possible, especially in holiday periods.
  • Townsville is a great place to stock up before you go camping, with everything you’d expect of a major city, a post office, pharmacy, visitor information centre, bank, and car hire companies.
  • Townsville can be reached by road, air and rail. Townsville Airport is a seven-minute drive from the city centre, and Queensland Rail’s Spirit of Queensland long-distance train travels to Townsville several times a week from Brisbane and Cairns.

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