Birch Bay State Park

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About Birch Bay State Park

1 park, 2 miles of saltwater shoreline, 3 miles of freshwater shoreline, all 4 you. Birch Bay State Park contains one of the last saltwater/freshwater estuaries in the Puget Sound, which means there are hella shellfish, birds, and other wildlife. The northern part of the park is a designated natural game sanctuary, so you can check out elk while they check out the view of the Canadian Gulf Islands across the Sound. Terrell Creek and its Marsh meander through the park and the Cascade Mountains surround it, so you see good shiz everywhere you look. If you have kiddos who don’t yet appreciate the purple mountain majesty or shining sea stuff, there are plenty of opportunities for you to lose to them in H-O-R-S-E or chicken while gazing in awe at the panoramic scenery.

Campgrounds in Birch Bay

Birch Bay Campground
Jonathan
Jonathan: Super nice camp sites, just a short walk to the beach and super nice clean bathrooms. The sites are...

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Birch Bay
hipcamper
June 5th, 2015
Birch Bay
hipcamper
June 5th, 2015
Birch Bay
hipcamper
June 5th, 2015
Birch Bay
hipcamper
June 5th, 2015
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Birch Bay
Birch Bay

1 Review

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Hipcamper Jonathan

Super nice camp sites, just a short walk to the beach and super nice clean bathrooms. The sites are well taken care of and really well sized. The near by shop is well stocked and just down the road on your way in. Highly recommend this to anyone in the area looking for a sweet site.

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History of Birch Bay State Park

Birch Bay was named by botanist Archibald Menzies for its abundance of black birch trees. Menzies was on the 1792 Vancouver expedition. Archeological evidence indicates that the bay was inhabited by Semiahmoo, Lummi, and Nooksack tribes since prehistoric times.

At the turn of the 20th century, the huge fir trees of the area were logged with oxen and horse teams. Large old-growth stumps, with spring-board marks, remain as evidence. Captain Vancouver stopped in Birch Bay during 1792 to calibrate instruments used to map their location and to brew beer, a common staple on the long voyage.