Purtis Creek State Park

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About Purtis Creek State Park

If you love lake, then you’ll love Purtis Creek State Park, just southwest of Dallas. The quaint 1,582-acre park is best known for its good fishin’ and shaded campsites. In the 355-acre lake, anglers can take home large catfish and crappie, but largemouth bass is “catch and release” only. Due to the small size, and large awesomeness of the lake, there is a no wake/speed restriction, and only 50 boats are allowed on the lake at any time. Once the 50-boat limit has been reached, the boat bouncer (we’re actually not sure if there is a ‘boat bouncer’ but think it sounds like a really cool job) waits until a boat leaves for new boats to enter--you know the drill. What’s even cooler is that you can stay overnight on the lake, for fishing, by paying a $2/person activity use fee. No sleep ‘till morning! Intimidated by all of this lake lingo and want to learn more? Rent a variety of boats (canoe, rowboat, paddle boat, one- and two-person kayaks), and participate in the Angler Education “Tackle Loaner Program”; where individuals can borrow rods, reels, and tackle boxes with all the goods. Go ahead and book a site--or stay overnight! We know you’ll ‘lake’ what you see.

Campgrounds in Purtis Creek

Purtis Creek Campground
It doesn’t even matter where you stay at Purtis Creek because you’ll be on the water all day, right?...

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Purtis Creek
hipcamper
February 22nd, 2015
Purtis Creek
hipcamper
February 22nd, 2015
Purtis Creek
hipcamper
June 5th, 2015
Purtis Creek
hipcamper
June 5th, 2015
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Purtis Creek
Purtis Creek
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History of Purtis Creek State Park

Purtis Creek State Park, 1,582.4 acres, is located in Henderson and Van Zandt counties. The park was acquired in 1977 from private owners and was opened to the public in 1988.

The park is located in an area where the Wichita and Caddo Indians once roamed. Just east of the park, on private property, is a cliff overhang that was used by unknown Indians as a temporary shelter. Petroglyphs carved into the rock walls indicate this land was a good hunting area.

The abundance of wild game caused an influx of white settlers in the early to mid-1800s. Many small towns and communities were established during this time. The road that lies on the south border of the park at the entrance was known as the Tyler to Porter's Bluff Road, a well-known stage route from East Texas to the Trinity River. Along this route, just northeast of Edom near the Neches River, is the site where the famed Cherokee Indian Chief Boles was slain in the Battle of the Neches in 1839.