Lake Corpus Christi State Park

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About Lake Corpus Christi State Park

Trivia question - Guess who came first, Lake Corpus Christi State Park or famous fashion designer Giorgio Armani? Trick question because they were both born in 1934! Just like Mr. Armani’s suits (though you’ll definitely want to leave those back at home), the lake itself is what steals most of the glamour at this south Texas park, just a 45-minute drive from the Gulf. The lake is a fisherman’s delight, stocked full with catfish as well as bass, crappie and sunfish weaving among Corpus Christi’s warm aqua waters. After a day of gliding among the cattails and water hyacinths in your canoe/kayak, bring in your catch to be grilled, sautéed or deep fried. Back on land, hike around the perimeter of the lake, lingering at the scenic overlooks and the long pier that juts out over a sandy beach. Bikers, you can be part of the fun too, as you explore the ins and outs of the park from its network of paved roads. The best part of this park experience? Falling asleep to the sound of lapping lake waves, with a happy heart -- and a stomach full of seafood.

Campgrounds in Lake Corpus Christi

Catfish Cove Campground

1. Catfish Cove Campground

Get your tent camping on at Lake Corpus Christi’s southernmost campground. Sites here come with water hookups, and more importantly to serious...

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Opossum Bend Campground

2. Opossum Bend Campground

Stay at Opossum Bend if you’re coming to Lake Corpus Christi to fish; the campground is situated right between one of the park’s two boat ramps and...

Mesquite Campground

3. Mesquite Campground

Boaters, rejoice: stay the night at Mesquite Campground and you’ll wake up right next to a boat ramp, making a day on the lake super convenient. In...

Javelina Campground

4. Javelina Campground

If you’re coming to Lake Corpus Christi with a trailer in tow, try to snag a spot at Javelina; the campsites here come tricked out with the...

Photos

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Lake Corpus Christi
hipcamper
February 21st, 2015
Lake Corpus Christi
hipcamper
February 21st, 2015
Lake Corpus Christi
hipcamper
February 21st, 2015
Lake Corpus Christi
hipcamper
February 21st, 2015
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Texas P.'s photo at Lake Corpus Christi
Hipcamp Staff's photo at Lake Corpus Christi
Hipcamp Staff's photo at Lake Corpus Christi
Hipcamp Staff's photo at Lake Corpus Christi

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History of Lake Corpus Christi State Park

Lake Corpus Christi State Park, a 356-acre park located in San Patricio, Jim Wells and Live Oak counties, southwest of Mathis, was leased from the city of Corpus Christi in 1934 (until 2032) and was opened in 1934. Many of the park's facilities were built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the 1930s. The 21,000-acre lake was formed by damming the Nueces River.

In January 1929, a reservoir called Lake Lovenskiold was created in this valley with the construction of La Fruita Dam across the Nueces River, which washed out in November that same year. The dam was rebuilt in 1935 with federal funds provided by President Roosevelt’s New Deal, and the name changed to Lake Corpus Christi.

The Civilian Conservation Corps Company 886 developed the 365-acre Lake Corpus Christi State Park between 1934 and 1935 on a cove where San Patricio, Jim Wells and Live Oak counties converge. CCC buildings included a bathhouse, park residence and a refectory, but only the refectory remains. This Mediterranean-style building was built of cast blocks of local caliche. The blocks were cast in various sizes and laid in a random-ashlar pattern, closely resembling cut limestone.

By the 1940s, as the new reservoir lost storage capacity from silting, it became evident that a new and larger dam and reservoir would be necessary. Opposition to the new dam by landowners in the proposed flood pool resulted in litigation that delayed construction for many years. The local water supply district finally won a favorable court decision, and the present dam was completed in 1958. Named in honor of Wesley E. Seale, chairman of the Lower Nueces River Water Supply District, the new dam made Lake Corpus Christi one of the largest artificial bodies of water in Texas. It covers 21,000 acres, with a capacity of 300,000 acre feet at the spillway elevation of 94 feet above sea level.