Caddo/LBJ National Grasslands

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About Caddo/LBJ National Grasslands

The Caddo/LBJ National Grasslands are located in central Texas about 43 miles north of Ft. Worth and cover roughly 17,784 acres. How about that for a day hike? Yhew! Hundreds of lakes and ponds ranging from 35-acre Black Creek Lake (near the campground) to 1/4-acre ponds make for some good fishin’ throughout the grasslands, and miles upon miles of trails make for an equestrian’s paradise. The grasslands are definitely worth your spare weekend time. At 17k+ acres, whether you fish, camp, hike, hunt, picnic, or are a pro at super relaxing, you shouldn’t have a problem finding something new to gauge your interest every time you visit!

Campgrounds in Caddo/LBJ

East Coffee Mill Lake Campground

1. East Coffee Mill Lake Campground

The Coffee Mill Lake is 750-acres of lake-tastic fun! Bring your boat, bring your bathing suit, your birthday suit--whatever floats your boat....

West Lake Crockett Campground

2. West Lake Crockett Campground

If Black Creek Lake (45-acres) is a too small for you, and Coffee Mill Lake is a little on the large size (750-acres), then West Lake should be...

Black Creek Lake Campground

3. Black Creek Lake Campground

Get your day game on here! Campsites are tucked in among shady oak, and comfortable, grassy grounds. This lake in particular is said to have good...

Della
Della: Black Creek Lake is about 100 miles west of Caddo Grasslands. It's in Wise County, near Decatur.

Photos

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Caddo/LBJ
hipcamper
June 5th, 2015
Caddo/LBJ
hipcamper
June 5th, 2015
Caddo/LBJ
hipcamper
June 5th, 2015
Caddo/LBJ
hipcamper
June 5th, 2015
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Lori F.'s photo at Caddo/LBJ
Lori F.'s photo at Caddo/LBJ

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Hipcamper Della

Black Creek Lake is about 100 miles west of Caddo Grasslands. It's in Wise County, near Decatur.

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History of Caddo/LBJ National Grasslands

Lyndon B. Johnson National Grassland (LBJ), of the Caddo-Lyndon B. Johnson National Grasslands, is the most southernly of the national grasslands and has a rich history. The land we now call LBJ was the home of great herds of bison, antelope, deer, and elk and a favored hunting ground of the Native people. The Caddo Indians, the largest Indian culture in Northeast Texas, were the first cultivators of this land. They were forced out around the mid-1700s by the more aggressive Apache and Comanche people. The European settlers, primarily stockmen, moved into the area in the 1800s with the farmers following in the early 1900s. The land has seen great cattle drives, with an estimated ten million head of cattle driven northward, and the advent of barbed wire. Cattle, barbed wire, and farming brought major changes to the land.

The areas now designated as "grasslands" were settled in the 1800s under a variety of "Homestead Acts" that opened the land to people, generally farmers, and helped to settle the west. A prolonged period of drought in the late 1920s into the 1930s caused some homesteads on sub-marginal farmland (a location receiving 15 or less inches of annual moisture) to literally dry up and blow away. During this time, Congress established the Land Utilization Program (LUP) which bought homesteads from bankrupt private owners and returned it to public land status. The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) helped to stabilize the eroding soil by re-seeding it and applying other conservation techniques. In the 1950s, the LUP holdings were assigned to the USDA Forest Service which was tasked with management of these sub-marginal lands. Over the years the Forest Service has established some twenty National Grasslands. "The designation of the area as National Grassland is not a description of the area as much as a statement of policy and effort to restore the area to a multiple of uses and benefits."