William M. Tugman State Park

Leave review

About William M. Tugman State Park

Easily accessed off of Hwy 101, but unattended by the masses, Tugman’s simple luxury is all shore pines and the blue electric whir of dragonflies guarding a lake’s perimeter. It is ospreys and eagles in mist-draped swoops and deer grazing in coastal forest thickets. It is white tipped ocean waves coming apart on a sandy shore like scattered diamonds and nearby dune recreation thrill rides. William M. Tugman provides a sweet spot to stay tucked away or a convenient anchor for further explorations through Oregon’s coastal camping variety. Bike, boat and fish, check out Reedsport, Coos Bay and the Umpqua River Lighthouse, as you experience the bewitching power of the coast’s dune swept heart.

Campgrounds in William M. Tugman

Tugman Campground

1. Tugman Campground

Electrical sites with water, hiker/biker camps, an RV dump station, flush toilets, hot showers, picnic tables, fire rings. A freshwater lake, boat...

1 Save

Photos

This park doesn't have any submitted photos—just yet.

William M. Tugman
hipcamper
June 5th, 2015
William M. Tugman
hipcamper
June 5th, 2015
William M. Tugman
hipcamper
September 3rd, 2015
No photo

Reviews

750
No one? Bueller? Sharing is caring, y'all.
Drop some William M. Tugman knowledge on us.

History of William M. Tugman State Park

The park was acquired between 1962 and 1976 through gifts from the Oregon State Game Commission and purchase from private owners. The park protects the public access to and use of Eel Lake, which over many years had become partly filled with logging debris. The lake was cleaned out by the Game Commission prior to its transfer for park purposes. The area has been developed for camping and day use, including boating and swimming and fishing. The name commemorates William M. Tugman (1894-1961), prominent newspaperman of Eugene and Reedsport. Tugman headed Governor Paul Patterson's State Park Advisory Committee, which made the important citizens' report and recommendations on State Parks in 1956. He became the first chairman of the State Parks and Recreation Advisory Committee, which was formed in 1957.