Harris Beach State Park

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About Harris Beach State Park

The cobalt crash of the wild Pacific is at your fingertips. The translucence of the steelhead and salmon filled Chetco and the thrill of the adventure laden Rogue rushes nearby. Harris Beach State Park is where water and forest showcase all their coveted combinations with unapologetic abandon. Jet boaters, beachcombers, mountain bikers, coastal forest hiking fanatics, and anglers will all hit jackpot at Harris. Wildlife watchers will feel especially enamored by the migrating gray whales, the California Sea lions and the Harbor seals, not to mention Bird Island--where you are likely to spot a tufted puffin. At Harris Beach you’ll find yourself 5 miles from the California border, with options to explore further South (redwoods anyone?) or treasures to take in slightly north (like a 12 mile long progression of striking coastal waysides!).

Campgrounds in Harris Beach

Harris Beach Campground

1. Harris Beach Campground

100% Recommend (4 Responses)

Harris Beach State Park Campground is a year-round, beachside, amenity-heavy, family-friendly spot with full hook-up sites, electrical sites with...

Lori
Lori: If you don't like the noise of children on a playground, avoid the camp sites that surround the playground. It can get SUPER...
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Hipcamper Lori

If you don't like the noise of children on a playground, avoid the camp sites that surround the playground. It can get SUPER noisy! Spots with best ocean view are A10-A24 (even numbered sites). C1 also has a view. A1, A2, A4, A6 get lots of nice sun!

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Hipcamper Lori

This campground can get busy with families on weekends so try and go during mid-week. Great hot showers with good water pressure and they are FREE! Also, each shower is its own little room so you don't have to share with anyone. Nice and private!

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Hipcamper Rob

Very well maintained. Gets a lot of day use, but quite peaceful at night. The tent sites are sort of segregated from RV sites, and have nice old school CCC-like masonry work.

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Hipcamper Jake

Massive, popular yet pleasant campground with incredible proximity to the beach and wonderful views and shoreside trails. Family friendly, friendly staff, clean and quiet (for a place of its size). There are some really killer campsites here that stand head and shoulders above the rest in terms of privacy, setting, and proximity to ocean views. I hope to return soon and write down which ones struck my fancy.

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Hipcamper Tommy

Another beautiful gym created by Oregon! This place is truly Amazing! Breath taking views of the rugged coastline with the powerful sounds of giant waves crashing into large jagged rocks. This place is one reason why I miss Oregon.

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Hipcamper Michael

Important note: This campground is scheduled to be closed Sept 8, 2015 through May 1, 2016 for paving and upgrades, contingent on funding. Check the website before heading out!

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Hipcamper Sully

Take a stroll out to the tide pools at low tide to hunt for critters in the rocks and keep your eyes peeled for the bobbing heads of seals out to sea.
The showers at this campground are wonderful (compared to your average campground) so go for it and indulge if you so decide. The sites that face the road have easier access to the cliff views but the inner sites tend to be a bit more shady.

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History of Harris Beach State Park

The land that is now Harris Beach State Park was purchased from various owners between 1926 and 1985. Early developments were made by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1934 and 1935. Harris Beach is named for George Scott Harris, a native of Scotland, who obtained the property about 1871. Harris served in the British Army in India, later going to Africa and New Zealand. He arrived in San Francisco in 1860, worked in railway construction and mining and migrated to Curry County in 1871 where he became a naturalized citizen on April 6, 1880. Mr. Harris raised sheep and cattle on the park land, which passed to his nephew, James, in 1925, and also served as Curry County Commissioner in 1886-87.