Hipcamp host Geri C.
Hosted by

Pitch your tent, set up your camper or RV under our apple trees or any of the other tree areas in the upper fields. There's a beautiful shady wooded area for walking and adventuring and also catch and release fishing in the creek that meanders through lower field. We have a picnic table, large fire pit several fire rings and a grill. We are working on building compostable to

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Pitch your tent, set up your camper or RV under our apple trees or any of the other tree areas in the upper fields. There's a beautiful shady wooded area for walking and adventuring and also catch and release fishing in the creek that meanders through lower field. We have a picnic table, large fire pit several fire rings and a grill. We are working on building compostable toilets. (Meaning we finally have the materials. Now we need the time to build them lol) There is a bar and grill across the street, the Jailhouse Tavern, they offer great food and live music. We are home to a Non-Profit group: Lorain County Music Foundation, that hosts Music Events and Festivals in our community to raise money to build a Kid's Rock Camp and help with school music programs. We are not currently hosting events presently and have plenty of room for primitive camping. (Yes, your reservation is considered/like a donation that helps us to stay functioning = you're helping a GOOD CAUSE)

This property holds a rich history: The eastern states knew that after the Revolutionary War of 1783, the best way to hold onto their claims on western lands was to populate them. Each began to formulate plans to grant lands to their war veterans as payment for services. The colonies began feuding over who owned these lands. General George Washington feared this infighting would negate their hard won victory. Connecticut men called this 3 million acre area in Ohio County,  New Conn. or the Conn. Western Reserve. Washington received authorization from Congress on April 28th 1800, to convey all rights to the Conn. Land Company to survey. Directors appointed General Moses Cleavland of Canterbury Conn. (Yes, CLEVELAND is named after this Moses Cleavland) and his expedition to investigate and survey

Major William Ingersoll of Grafton Massachusetts, received his land as payment for his service in the revolutionary war. In 1816 he sent his older sons Seth Crocker and Thomas Ingersoll with the Rawson brothers; Grindall and Jonathan, and the Sibley brothers; George and John, to locate their Ohio land. 

In the spring of 1816 “The men arrived first in Cleavland to find a collection of huts.” From there the men walked to Liverpool, portage County, and then to Township 4. “at that time a primeval wilderness where yet roamed the Indian and many a wild savage animal.” There was no road, just markings on trees left by previous surveyors. At their destination the men set camp and viewed their acres and found dense, wet, silent Forest; rolling land and solitude. They looked up to see huge trees some with trunks 12 - 13 feet in diameter and 100 feet high. Creating a forest so dense no sunlight touched their faces. The men built a 12x12 foot shanty and left 15 men, and went back to Mass. for the rest of their families and supplies. 

The Major left from Grafton Mass. in September 16 of 1816 for Township 4 range XVI, arriving Nov 4th 1816, according to his daughter Harriet Nesbitt’s memoirs, which are recorded in the book; 190 Years, 1817-2007 - Grafton Ohio Our Heritage Trail . The 1st cabin built in Grafton Twp. was on lot 26 and the 2nd was on lot 15 and in Nov of 1816 the Ingersoll family 8 people in all, called this home and are credited with being the first family in the township.

“ The Ingersoll’s cared for their family; to them family meant anyone in need. They cared for their neighbors, and neighbors might be anyone in the county. Because of these beliefs, others would be welcome to live in the Ingersoll Homestead until another house could be built.”

Our property is Lot 15. The 1st child born in Grafton was in the 2nd cabin here, Seth C. and his wife Polly’s oldest daughter Nancy born May 18 of 1817. according to tax records, the house was built in 1824 and is one of the last remaining frame built homes in Grafton /Grafton Twp. and Seth C. passed away at the age of 74, in the home in the 1859. 

“In the wilderness, everyone in the settlement came together to build the homes. Men and Oxen did the hard labor, able boys helped. The women cared for the children and the livestock. They cleaned, sewed, made candles and tended livestock. Cooking for the settlement was done in a huge kettle over an open fire until stones could be dug from one of the nearby creeks and fashioned into a hearth. Food to fortify residents and workers during the coming winter, including barrels of flour had to be carried from Canton, Stark County, or Columbiana and Liverpool at great expense.”

We will base ourselves on the same beliefs as the Ingersoll Families: We want to help anyone in need! We offer you shelter and welcome to our homestead, just like they offered to so many of their pioneering guests. We walk the area a lot and have found many artifacts, and antique items. The entire Family is buried around the corner in a Cemetery Seth C.'s daughter created. We know that their kind spirits are still with us encouraging love and caring.

Campsite area
Bring your own tents, vans, trailers, RVs
10 sites
Up to 8 guests per site
Park at listing
No ADA access
Essentials
Campfires allowed
Pets allowed
No toilet
Amenities
Kitchen available
Picnic table available
Bins available
No potable water
No showers
No wifi
RV details
Pull-in site, max length 70ft
Hookups available (electricity)
Ask about water hookup
Ask about television hookup
Ask about generators
Surface type unknown, levelness unknown
Have a question? Send Geri a message!
  • Check in: After 12PM
  • Check out: Before 12PM
  • Cancellation policy: Moderate
  • On arrival: Meet and greet
  • Minimum nights: 1 night
  • Accepts bookings: 1 month out

Activities

Offered on the Host's property or nearby.

Biking

There are Metro Parks bike trails nearby

Fishing
Hiking
Wildlife watching

Terrain

Natural features you'll find at Harmony Fields in Ohio.

Forest
Prairie, meadow, ...
River, stream or ...
Suburban or backyard
Wetlands
Farm
Driveway

The vibe at Harmony Fields

Places to see near Harmony Fields

3 Written reviews
This listing has no reviews yet.
If you stayed here and have some insider info for us, let us know!
Hipcamper Suzanne
Suzanne V.
recommends this listing.
(Site 10)
January 20th, 2019

Geri was amazing, communicating quickly and clearly! My sister and I planned to stay 1 night here in a camper in January. Unfortunately, we decided against staying here last minute due to an escalating winter storm.

Hipcamper Claire

Communicative and understanding

Claire B.
recommends this listing.
(Site 10)
June 8th, 2019

Geri was very quick to respond to communication and so understanding and flexible when my road trip had me rescheduling twice. Directions were spot on and not too far from downtown Cleveland.

Hipcamper Karen

Do not reserve at harmony fields

Karen M.
doesn't recommend this listing.
(Site 10)
July 7th, 2019

Geri & Harmony Fields was a terrible mistake. We spent 3 hours trying to get to her location. (I know the train stopped in the middle of town for 2 or more hours wasn't her fault). Once we actually found her address, there was no way to drive into her driveway and a car was blocking driveway #2 that we were supposed to take. She didn't reply to 2 phone messagess, and when my husband knock on the door, no one came forward. I would not reccommend anyone to stay here. She may no longer be a participant with Hip Camp, but i had received an acceptance, a confirmation number, and a charge against my credit card. Now I will try to get a refund. Karen

Property
Harmony Fields
State
Ohio
$25/night
10 Sites