Total Path-Heart of Eclipse

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About Total Path-Heart of Eclipse

Hipcamp host Bear Trail
Hosted byBear Trail
Eclipse 2017 A total solar eclipse will cross the continental US on Monday, August 21, 2017. Everyone in the U. S. will see at least a partial eclipse — but you have to be within the “path of totality” to experience the full effect. The path of totality is a gentle 70-mile-wide arc that crosses 13 states, shown in green on our map. There are hundreds of places to camp along the Read more...

Eclipse 2017

A total solar eclipse will cross the continental US on Monday, August 21, 2017. Everyone in the U.S. will see at least a partial eclipse — but you have to be within the “path of totality” to experience the full effect. The path of totality is a gentle 70-mile-wide arc that crosses 13 states, shown in green on our map. There are hundreds of places to camp along the path, and we’re partnering with landowners to add new eclipse-viewing campsites every day.

To watch this astronomic phenomenon unfold, station yourself in the path (with a pair of eclipse glasses) around 9am Pacific or 1pm EST, depending on your exact location. The total eclipse itself lasts about a minute, but it’s considered the best chance for us tiny humans to gauge the full scale of the universe firsthand — stellar! Tens of thousands of eclipse viewers are expected to flock to the path of totality to observe it, and for good reason: the next total solar eclipse over the continental U.S. won’t occur until April 8, 2024.

Thousands of nature enthusiasts are flocking to this “path of totality” leading up to the Eclipse. In fact, this is expected to be the most viewed solar eclipse in human history.

This August, a truly rare astronomical event is taking place across the United States. On Monday, August 21st, a total solar eclipse will cross the entirety of the continental US—and trust us, you’re going to want to be camping for it.

To experience the full effect of the total eclipse, you’ll have to make a pilgrimage to somewhere within the “path of totality”—a 70-mile-wide arc that crosses 13 states from Oregon to South Carolina. Starting at 10:15 a.m. in Madras, OR, the Sun, Moon and Earth will perfectly align, casting the Moon’s shadow upon the Earth, and fully darkening the daytime sky. That’s right—if you’re in the path of totality, you’ll be able to see a starry sky sometime around noon. (You’ll still be able to view a partial eclipse from anywhere outside of this path, but it won’t be as cool.)

A solar eclipse of this stature has never crossed the contiguous United States, and won’t again until April 2024. If you haven’t started planning your Eclipse camping trip, now’s the time to get on it. Public campgrounds, hotels, motels, and your buddies’ couches within the path of totality have been booked for months, but there are hundreds of places you can still camp along the path.

We highly recommend reserving a campsite before making the trek to the path. As you can imagine, tens of thousands of other nature lovers will be flocking there as well. Trying to score a first-come, first-serve site during this camping extravaganza is going to be as hard as it gets—you’ll want to be prepared.

You probably remember being told this a million times as a kid, but you should never look directly into the sun because the sun’s rays can cause serious damage to your eyes. The safest way to view the eclipse in all its stages is to get special eclipse viewing glasses—these ain’t your average shades, but special glasses that block out the harmful rays. They can cost less than a dollar a piece if you order a pack of 20 — so rally a group and enjoy matching stunners.

There are several other ways of safely viewing the eclipse, like making a pinhole projector (remember those?). We’ll defer to NASA for some additional safety information.

Getting there: Plan additional travel time getting to and from wherever you’re viewing the Eclipse, especially if you’re traveling within the path of totality. People are saying this will be the most viewed Eclipse of all time—so you won’t be the only one out there!

The “totality” (the time when the moon completely blocks the sun) only occurs for about a minute or two depending on where you are along the path. Make sure you know exactly when totality is occurring in your area and get situated long before so you can enjoy the stages leading up to the total eclipse. Find viewing times on this handy interactive Google Map.

What to bring—besides packing your usual camping essentials, there are a few items you definitely won’t want to forget this trip:

Extra layers: During the totality, the epic darkness will cause a 10-15-degree drop in temperature. So, pack that puffy jacket and your comfiest wool socks — you don’t want to get distracted during the totality by the shivers.

Something to sit on: a camp chair and blanket aren’t camping essentials if you’re used to backcountry camping or roughing it. But if you’re hanging out waiting for totality, comfort is key.

Your eclipse glasses: what did we say before?!

Fires are allowed
Potable water is available
Spigot, Bottled water or jugs
Pets are allowed
On leash
  • Listing type: Private
  • No. of sites: 32
  • Accessible by: Drive
  • Accommodation: Tent, Vehicles & RVs
  • Check in after: 6AM
  • Check out before: 12AM
  • Cancellation policy: Flexible
  • On arrival: Go straight to camp
  • Minimum nights: None
  • Accepts bookings: 12 months out
  • Response time: Within 6 hours
  • Response rate: 100%

The vibe at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse

Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Bear Trail T.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
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Sean C.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Sean C.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Sean C.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Sean C.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Sean C.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Sean C.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Sean C.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Sean C.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
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Alison D.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
Alison D.'s photo at Total Path-Heart of Eclipse
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Hipcamper Sean

For not having been open in years the site was very nice. They have plans to get the showers and bathrooms working when that is done this will be a great site. My only criticism would be that the sites were somewhat close together. If you are in an rv that shouldn't be an issue but with tents it is nicer to have more space. I look forward to seeing the site after the improvements.

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Hipcamper Grant

I was told there was a new, better campsite available, but the coordinates I received did not lead me to a campsite and Bear Trail was unresponsive to calls and messages.

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Hipcamper Alison

The hosts were wonderful and helpful and provided a great spot! The electric hook up and water available was an added bonus! Our favorite part was the most picture perfect creek that adjoined our camp spot. We will for sure be back!

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Hipcamper Ruby

We found a great spot! They helped out with making fires and were super nice. Very welcoming! Had an amazing time, thank you!

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Property
Historic Christmas Tree Farm
State
North Carolina
Directions
View on Google Maps
Coordinates
35.22° N, 83.125° W
$30/night
RV / Trailer: 32 Sites