Samuel P. Taylor State Park

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About Samuel P. Taylor State Park

Majestic redwoods, rolling hills, oak studded grasslands and flowing creeks combine in a gorgeous display of natural beauty at Samuel P. Taylor State Park. This Marin County staple contains over 2,700 acres of redwood and grassland, including 600 acres of old-growth forest. The park offers a vast network of hiking trails, which make it relatively easy to hop to the top of Mount Barnabe. Needless to say, you will not be disappointed when you visit this gorgeous park.

Campgrounds in Samuel P. Taylor

Madrone Cabins

1. Madrone Cabins

100% Recommend (3 Responses)

Set slightly away from the fray—the site is located near the Madrone group campsite, and across a road from the main site itself—this is a nice...

Anna
Anna: Check out the Barnabe Peak hike for a gorgeous six miles alone in the mountains with sweeping views of Marin - hidden gem!
171 Saves
Camp Taylor Area

2. Camp Taylor Area

95% Recommend (30 Responses)

When it comes to camping at Samuel P Taylor, this is really the main event. More than 50 campsites with restrooms, hot pay showers and piped...

Alex
Alex: Sites 2-17 all have a frustratingly clear view of the major roadway Frances Drake Blvd, would recommend staying away if you're...
102 Saves
Devil's Gulch Group Campground

3. Devil's Gulch Group Campground

88% Recommend (4 Responses)

While the name is a little bit scary, don’t let that keep you from trying out one of the campsites that overlook the(not scary at all) Devil’s...

Alex
Alex: Kinda pricey, just looked up Group Tent sites on park.ca.gov and it's $50/night. Worth it if you're camping with a few folks,...
31 Saves

20 Reviews

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Drop some Samuel P. Taylor knowledge on us.
Hipcamper Alex

Sites 2-17 all have a frustratingly clear view of the major roadway Frances Drake Blvd, would recommend staying away if you're trying to escape into nature for peace and quiet. Hard to ignore the constant hum of passing cars and shouts of passing cyclists.

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Hipcamper Julie

Stayed at site 59, which was nicely tucked in the back of the park, though next to the restrooms which can be a plus or minus. It was a plus! Pretty quiet when we went, and explored a few trails connected to the campground which were rad. Site had plenty of space for glamping, enough so that we were able to setup and play Kubb.

Would definitely go back, it was a easy retreat from the city for the weekend, and greatly shortens the drive to Bolinas if you want to get a few early bird surfing sessions in without driving from the city. The recipe for the best weekend can be found here, and looks a little like this: Surf > Camp > Repeat.

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Hipcamper Anna

Check out the Barnabe Peak hike for a gorgeous six miles alone in the mountains with sweeping views of Marin - hidden gem!

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Hipcamper Stephanie

The website indicates no dogs allowed. "Dogs or other pets are not allowed in the cabin area, violators may be subject to a $250 fine and/or ejection."

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Hipcamper Alex

Kinda pricey, just looked up Group Tent sites on park.ca.gov and it's $50/night. Worth it if you're camping with a few folks, not really feeling that for a solo trip!

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Hipcamper A
A

We’ve heard that the top campsites are #’s 34-36 and 53-54.

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Hipcamper Sasha

The Cross Marin Trail runs right through the park, and is a runner's dream: flat + shaded with water fountains and bathrooms along the way!

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Hipcamper A
A

Azalea picnic area is one of the best places in the park for a nice picnic

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Hipcamper A
A

Raccoons are extremely crafty here-- they have turned the art of stealing food into a science. Make sure you lock up your goods and ice chests.

Hipcamper A
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Most of the campsites are shaded by the beautiful redwoods which is awesome, but it also can get a bit chilly. Make sure to bring extra layers.

Hipcamper A
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Use the "modern" looking food storage units to put your stuff in. They are a bit more effective than the more rustic wooden units.

Hipcamper A
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Keep your eyes peeled for poison oak. Remember…”leaves of three let ‘em be!”

Hipcamper A
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Some sites can be a bit cozy, but this is mainly due to the fact that you’re camping among massive Redwood trees. Even Shaq would feel small!

Hipcamper Mikey

We camped at site 59, which was close to a restroom and trash, which was a plus for us. This site was large enough for a camper van. Make sure to bring quarters for the shower facility! Showers and bathrooms were very clean. Sites are a little close together.

I would avoid sites with low numbers, as they are close to the roadway and the sound could be distributing, especially at night.

Hipcamper A
A

Tomales Bay is a great place to pick up fresh oysters. It’s about a 25 minute drive, but we think it’s worth it!

Hipcamper A
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Hit up Olema Farm House restaurant a few miles up the road for a taste of the good life plus a tasty beer. Cornmeal fried oysters. That's pretty much all you need in life other than grabbing a spot here!

Hipcamper Stephanie

While dogs are allowed, they are not permitted on any of the real hiking trails. We stayed at #17 - prob the worst site. It has a road on 3 sides so there was no privacy and constant foot/bicycle/traffic. The provided lockers & heavy-duty pic tables were great

Hipcamper jake

Stayed at site 29. Good spot and nice amount of room. I was a little bummed that all the good trails around the campground are not dog friendly, but I would think the trail running would be awesome.

I thought this campground was really beautiful but the park ranger was a little cranky and it felt a little over regulated. I would definitely return for an overnight camping trip (we live about 1.5 hours a way) but wouldn't be that into being there for multiple days.

Oh and those raccoons are tenacious food hunters. The struggle is real.

Hipcamper Timothy

I didn't have a reservation, but walked up on a Monday, so there were plenty of vacant sites. Couldn't check in till 2pm as a walk up.
Stayed in site #54. Cozy little spot, with a clear view of the sky. There are other sites relatively close, but for the most part you feel secluded.
You could for sure tetris 2 tents into the space.
Ranger sells wood for $8 a bundle and there's a small store just down the road in case you forget anything.
I paid $35 for the night.
2 separate run-ins with said Raccoons so hide yo kids hide yo wives!

Hipcamper sarah

gets cold due to trees

History of Samuel P. Taylor State Park

The park is named for Samuel Penfield Taylor, who came to California from Saugerties, New York in 1849 to try his luck in the gold rush. He actually found gold, cashed in, and entered the lumber business.

Purchasing 101 acres of timberland along Papermill Creek (then called Daniel's Creek), Taylor built a paper mill and established a paper-making process. Using scrap paper and rags from San Francisco, the mill produced newsprint and the world’s first square-bottomed paper bags -- a novelty at the time.

Taylor, with help from the Northern Pacific Coast Railroad, built a resort hotel and Camp Taylor, one of the first sites in the US to offer camping as a recreational pursuit. The area was one of California's most popular and well-known weekend recreation destinations in the 1870s-1880s.