Lassen Volcanic National Park

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About Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen Volcanic National Park has it all: every type of volcano, snowy mountains, hot springs, pristine lakes, forests, and even an egg-like smell in the geothermal areas. A trip to Lassen promises to be unforgettable. It is one of the least visited national parks simply because people haven’t heard of its wonders, and that’s mainly because visitors want to keep its beauty a secret! There is no shortage of adventure at Lassen when there are active volcanoes, bubbling liquids, rock climbing, snowshoeing and so much more to see and experience.

Campgrounds in Lassen Volcanic

Summit Lake South Campground

1. Summit Lake South Campground

Located next to the stunning Summit Lake, this southern stretch of campground offers almost the same remarkable view of forest and snowy peaks....

Mailisha
Mailisha: $20 per night; pit toilets; potable water avail (in summer only) We ended up finding a spot in Loop E because this loop is...
32 Saves
Manzanita Lake Group Campground

2. Manzanita Lake Group Campground

Manzanita Lake Group Campground is perfect for families to enjoy the beauty of the calm lake and swim, kayak, and fish. It is also ideal for RVs...

Jerry
Jerry: There is an entry fee to get into the park if you don't have an annual pass. Camping is about $24 a night for all spaces. The...
15 Saves
Warner Valley Campground

3. Warner Valley Campground

Located in the heart of Lassen, the Warner Valley Campground offers dozens of different activities. The fiery Devil’s Kitchen, steamy Boiling...

15 Saves
Juniper Lake Group Campground

4. Juniper Lake Group Campground

The group campgrounds branch off of the Juniper Lake campgrounds and offer tent camping for groups larger than 10, so bring the extended family and...

9 Saves
Manzanita Lake Campground

5. Manzanita Lake Campground

Just like the group campgrounds, Manzanita Lake Campground is made up of 4 loops: A and C are reservable and B and D are first-come first-serve....

Kristina
Kristina: Not sure why, but the Manzanita Lake Group Campground comes up as the first search result. Anyways...this is my go to...
8 Saves
Butte Lake Campground

6. Butte Lake Campground

Located near highway 44 at the end of Butte Lake Road, there is plenty to do at this campground! Bathtub Lake and the majestic Cinder Cone are...

Paulina
Paulina: Quiet campground on the other side of Lassen Volcanic National Park, far removed from the main section of the park. Running...
6 Saves
Manzanita Lake Cabins

7. Manzanita Lake Cabins

Located near the northwest entrance, these 20 rustic cabins are the newest ones built. They offer double and single rooms as well as bunkhouses....

5 Saves
Juniper Lake Campground

8. Juniper Lake Campground

This tranquil campground is located on the eastern shore of Juniper Lake between a horse corral and Inspiration Point atop the Crystal Cliffs. This...

Victoria
Victoria: FYI-- that picture is from Juniper Campground on Mt Diablo, which is nowhere near Juniper Lake. I haven't been to Juniper Lake,...
4 Saves
Summit Lake North Campground

9. Summit Lake North Campground

This northern campground is within walking distance to Summit Lake and offers flush toilets and occasional programs at the amphitheater. Lush green...

3 Saves
Crags Campground

10. Crags Campground

Crags Campground is within short hiking distance to the stunning Manzanita Lake as well as Lost Creek and the Devastated Areas. Crags is the best...

Erik
Erik: Note: This is closed as of 2014 and has been converted for 2016 into the Volcano Adventure Camp, see...
3 Saves
Southwest Walk In Campground

11. Southwest Walk In Campground

The Southwest Campground is located right next to the Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center, a place definitely worth checking out for a cultural and...

1 Save
Lost Creek Group Campground

12. Lost Creek Group Campground

Take advantage of the picnic tables, fire grates and nearby parking for a group getaway at Lost Creek! This campground is a short hike from...

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Lassen Volcanic
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December 15th, 2015
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20 Reviews

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Hipcamper Jerry

There is an entry fee to get into the park if you don't have an annual pass. Camping is about $24 a night for all spaces. The four campgrounds are fairly large and they only accept reservations in at least one of them. Bring your own wood or a good hatchet.

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Hipcamper A
A

Going to Lassen is a humbling experience-- aside from the usual admiration for the trees and lakes, you also develop an appreciation for the stuff no one really thinks about, like the earth’s crust!

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Hipcamper A
A

The bathrooms in the visitor’s center are always open in case you’re not a big fan of roughing it.

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Hipcamper Paulina

Quiet campground on the other side of Lassen Volcanic National Park, far removed from the main section of the park. Running water (spigots and toilets) are available at this campsite. Close to the lake.

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Hipcamper Brian

You can rent Kayaks at the lake or bring your own. Well worth the time to get out and explore. There is a nice trail around the lake if water isn't your thing.

Hipcamper Mailisha

$20 per night; pit toilets; potable water avail (in summer only)
We ended up finding a spot in Loop E because this loop is tents-only & nonreservable, and our trip was a last-minute decision. Loop C is the best one though, if you can plan ahead & reserve.

Hipcamper Mailisha

Nice place to camp, even if the sites are a bit too close to one another for my taste. We stayed for 4 nights and did many fabulous hikes with our young kids. I was surprised by how many people came & stayed for only 1-2 nights, though. High turnover.

Hipcamper Mailisha

This campground seemed a little too "developed" for our taste, so we chose Summit Lake instead. At Manzanita there was a store, showers, a deli, and even a laundry facility! But I heard from some hikers that Loop D is tents only and was pretty peaceful. Hmm...

Hipcamper A
A

Don’t even think about jumping in the hot springs unless you want to be boiled like an egg. Some are over 300 degrees Fahrenheit; they come from an active volcano!

Hipcamper A
A

There is usually snow from October until July, so be prepared for any weather!

Hipcamper Paulina

Quiet campground in a quiet national park close to many trails. Water spigots are available at every other campsite. Pit toilets only.

Hipcamper Mailisha

No need to bring kindling- there is PLENTY to find. Next time I'll bring my own hatchet though, so I can avoid buying the expensive firewood from the Manzanita store. There is a lot of free wood available, much of it too huge to fit in your fire pit: MUST CUT.

Hipcamper Victoria

FYI-- that picture is from Juniper Campground on Mt Diablo, which is nowhere near Juniper Lake. I haven't been to Juniper Lake, but I've been to Juniper on Mt Diablo many, many times.

Hipcamper Kristina

This is one of my go-to campgrounds! If you can get there by Friday night, Loop D for tents only is THE BEST. It's fairly peaceful for it being a campground, especially if you can get a site facing the woods. Lake Manzanita is pretty great since you can fly fish, hike around the lake (about 3ish miles all flat) and you can rent kayaks and stand-up paddle boards. Staying at this site has a lot of creature comforts but is also an easy drive to the Lassen Peak Trailhead and Bumpass Hell. I'm a big fan of the soft serve ice cream at the camp store :)

Hipcamper Kristina

This is a pretty rad campground! We stayed this past weekend (one week before they close for the winter) and we had to bring our own water as the spigots were turned off for the season due to the drought. We had site #55 which was very spacious and overlooked the trail to Cinder Cone. It's certainly a place that's quiet and much less crowded!

Hipcamper Kristina

Not sure why, but the Manzanita Lake Group Campground comes up as the first search result. Anyways...this is my go to campground when I want to just get away. It's truly an undiscovered gem! Loop D is for tents only and is first come, first served, but if you get there by early Friday evening, you should be able to get a site! There's lots to do in the park including the hike up Mount Lassen (for those of you who have lots of energy), hike to Bumpass Hell (the geothermal area) or a leisurely walk around Manzanita Lake with one of the most picturesque views of Mount Lassen. Oh and the campstore has softserve (store only open in summer).

Hipcamper Scott

Beautiful campgrounds right by the lake. Lassen is like the Yellowstone of California, but without the crowds. From the campsites, there are a bunch of small lakes and ponds within walking distance, and it's pretty easy to drive around the park to the various attractions.

Hipcamper Erik

Note: This is closed as of 2014 and has been converted for 2016 into the Volcano Adventure Camp, see https://www.nps.gov/lavo/planyourvisit/vac.htm

Hipcamper Christina

Bring something to pad your knees for exploring the underground caves.

Hipcamper Khriszha

Lassen is a beautiful area up in Northern California! Plenty to do and lots of little hidden gems in this area. We did a backpacking trip here and was so well worth the 2 day hike from Butte lake to Snag. This is bear country so be carefully prepared to store your food and scented necessities. Either bring a bear canister or a bear proof bag. Also make sure you know how to hang the bags between trees. It took us a few hours to make sure ours was secure. That said, assure that you have atlas 100 ft. of paracord packed. While here, make sure to check our painted dunes and Cinder cone nearby.

History of Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen Volcanic National Park started as two separate national monuments designated by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1907: Cinder Cone National Monument and Lassen Peak National Monument. The fifteenth national park established by Congress, Lassen is one of the oldest national parks in the United States. It is named after a Danish blacksmith named Peter Lassen who used Lassen Peak as a landmark on a trek to the Sacramento Valley in the 1830s.
Inconsistent newspaper accounts reported by witnesses from 1850 to 1851 described seeing "fire thrown to a terrible height" and "burning lava running down the sides" in the area of Cinder Cone. Early geologists and volcanologists who studied the Cinder Cone concluded the last eruption occurred between 1675 and 1700. Minor eruptions occurred in 1914-1915 and documented artifacts and photographs are on display in the Loomis museum.
The Lassen area was a meeting point for at least four American Indian groups: Atsugewi, Yana, Yahi, and Maidu. Because of its weather and snow conditions, generally high elevation, and seasonally mobile deer populations, the Lassen area was not conducive to year-round living. Tribal descendants still live in the area and are valuable partners to the park. Members have worked with the National Park Service to provide cultural demonstrations and to help visitors understand both modern and historical tribal culture.