Lassen National Forest

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About Lassen National Forest

Lassen National Forest is considered the Crossroads of California, where the different environments of the mountains, volcanoes, and desert cross in one massive forest. Here, you can explore the 1.2 million acres by swimming in huge lakes, looking over panoramic mountain views, and skiing under snowy pines. You can sleep under the twinkling stars in the dozens of campsites dispersed throughout the area, or head out into the backcountry of the three wilderness forests: Ishi, Caribou and Thousand Lakes all offer crazy adventures, native culture, and history. Adventure awaits no matter where you end up in Lassen!

Campgrounds in Lassen

Bogard Campground

1. Bogard Campground

Get ready to camp out close to the geologic wonder of Lassen National Park at Bogard Campground. These remote campsites provide unfathomable...

8 Saves
Potato Patch Campground

2. Potato Patch Campground

Looking for a respite from Central Valley Heat? Head to Potato Patch Campground located along the refreshing waters of Deer Creek. Campsites are...

Karolis
Karolis: Great campsite along the windy mountain road and right by the creek. Camped here on a motorcycle trip - easy to get in, easy to...
8 Saves
Cave Campground

3. Cave Campground

Cave Campground sits on the shady banks of Hat Creek, famous for its trophy-sized wild trout. If you can tear yourself away from your fishing pole,...

6 Saves
Hat Creek Campground

4. Hat Creek Campground

Hat Creek Campground is nestled in a mixed conifer forest along the banks of Hat Creek, known for its trophy-size trout. There are great adventures...

4 Saves
Christie Campground

5. Christie Campground

Eagle Lake has flush toilets and electricity for all your grooming needs, making Christie Campground a high-end camping option (but not quite...

4 Saves
Goumaz Campground

6. Goumaz Campground

Goumaz Campground is a great camping spot for visitors exploring the Bizz Johnson National Recreation Trail. There are also opportunities for...

James
James: Good boondock site. Right next to Susan River. I was there in mid-May, lotsa mosquitos until things cooled off around 8pm.
3 Saves
Honn Campground

7. Honn Campground

Honn Creek sits on the banks of Honn Creek just a few miles from the Thousand Lakes Wilderness. There are great hiking trails nearby, and the...

3 Saves
Almanor Campground

8. Almanor Campground

This campground is welcoming to tenters and RVers alike. The campground is split into Almanor North and South: the latter has 3 loops, peaceful...

2 Saves
Rocky Campground

9. Rocky Campground

Rocky Campground is shaded by pines and sits along Hat Creek. There is great fishing here, and the campground is popular with anglers, so come...

2 Saves
Big Pine Campground

10. Big Pine Campground

Before hastily trekking out to explore the dense expanse of trees known as the Lassen National Forest, it would be to your benefit to visit the...

2 Saves
Aspen Grove Campground

11. Aspen Grove Campground

This tent campground is primarily first-come first-served: campsites #1-10 are walk-up. This shady and spacious campground offers easy access to...

2 Saves
Battle Creek Campground

12. Battle Creek Campground

True to it's name, Battle Creek Campground is nestled beside Battle Creek close to Lassen National Park. The quaint campsites offer a refreshing...

2 Saves
Cherry Hill Campground

13. Cherry Hill Campground

Before hastily trekking out to explore the dense expanse of trees known as the Lassen National Forest, it would be to your benefit to visit the...

1 Save
Merrill Campground

14. Merrill Campground

Family fun? Flush toilets? Firewood for sale? Enough with the F’s, this campground deserves an A+! There are 6 loops perfect for large tent cities...

1 Save
Eagle Campground

15. Eagle Campground

Eagle Campground is by the Eagle Lake Marina, where you can rent boats, take hot showers, buy snacks from the convenience store, and even do...

Dusty Campground

16. Dusty Campground

Dusty Campground sits on the banks of beautiful Lake Britton, near the Pit River. Campsites are shaded by oak and pine, and are particularly...

Roxie Peconom Campground

17. Roxie Peconom Campground

Roxie Peconom Campground is one of the lesser-known sites in Lassen National Forest and is surrounded by a dense stand of Douglas fir. The...

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8 Reviews

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Hipcamper Karolis

Great campsite along the windy mountain road and right by the creek. Camped here on a motorcycle trip - easy to get in, easy to get out. Best part is probably the creek - take your coffee there in the morning.

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Hipcamper James

Good boondock site. Right next to Susan River. I was there in mid-May, lotsa mosquitos until things cooled off around 8pm.

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Hipcamper A
A

If you’re looking for a hell of a road trip, drive the 67-mile Worldmaker’s Trail, an ancient trail created by the Mountain Maidu Indians. Stop for short hikes along the way to experience the swamps, waterfalls, forests and deserts. Check out a breakdown of the trail at the bottom of this Sherpa Guide.

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Hipcamper A
A

Fill up on gas beforehand! The nearest gas stations are in Susanville and Chester.

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Hipcamper A
A

The Bizz Johnson National Recreation Trail is definitely worth checking out. You can’t go wrong with rivers, canyons and tunnels. The section by the Susan River is the most scenic!

Hipcamper A
A

It gets hot during the summer, but it’s still pretty darn nice to cool off by one of the lakes. Or you can head over during the winter for snow sports!

Hipcamper A
A

The Subway Cave is a must-see, but plan accordingly!

Hipcamper James

Actual location is here:
https://goo.gl/maps/q4LrJNHB1Rk

History of Lassen National Forest

The forest was formed in 1905 when it was named one of the National Forest Reserves, which evolved into the National Forest system. The forest was first named the Lassen Peak Forest Reserve because of Lassen Peak, a volcano which is in the southernmost portion of the Cascade Range volcanoes.
Lassen National Forest is also the site of significant events in California history: Ishi Wilderness was the refuge of the "last wild Indian,” Caribou Wilderness was one of first protected "primitive areas" decades before the federal wilderness system was established, and the volcanic explosion of Mt. Lassen was the first eruption to be witnessed and photographed in the history of the continental United States.
Externally, the National Park Service sought to expand parks from existing public lands, primarily national forest lands. The forest service responded by creating primitive areas. Initially these new wilderness areas received no special protections other than the official designation. Caribou Primitive area became a likely candidate for primitive status as it shares the length of its western border with the national park.
Caribou Primitive Area received greater protection in 1939, when Interior Secretary Harold Ickes sought to convince President Franklin D. Roosevelt to combine the national forests and the National Park Service into a new agency under the management of the United States Department of Interior. Roosevelt declined to act, but the threat of moving the Forest Service out of the United States Department of Agriculture resulted in greater protections for national forest wilderness areas. A congressional bill had earlier given the President authority to act on this new Department of Conservation.
In 1964, Caribou was among the first group of federally protected wildernesses created by the first Wilderness Act. The Lassen forest also contains the 16,335-acre Thousand Lakes Wilderness, also created in 1964.