Henry W. Coe State Park

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About Henry W. Coe State Park

This is one wild and open space -89,000 acres to be exact! In fact, Henry W Coe is the largest state park in Northern California of wild open spaces! It’s rugged, vast and beautiful, with soaring ridges and sheer canyons. Despite the park’s varied terrain and vast expanse, it is lesser known than most other park, making Henry W. Coe the perfect spot for a secluded paradise.

Campgrounds in Henry W. Coe

Coe Ranch Campground

1. Coe Ranch Campground

86% Recommend (11 Responses)

Coe Ranch Campground has opportunities for both RV and tent camping, and all sites include a fire ring, picnic table and access to piped water and...

Katey
Katey: Hip Camp says that campsite 5-7 are secluded-- but only if you have all 3 sites. They're very close to each other with no...
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Hipcamper Katey

Hip Camp says that campsite 5-7 are secluded-- but only if you have all 3 sites. They're very close to each other with no privacy but a spectacular view. Go with sites 10-12 if you want privacy. Better yet: pay the extra $$ to book a Manzanita Group Camp.

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Hipcamper Hipcamper
Hipcamper

Keep an eye out for our hairy friends...tarantulas. They are mostly friendly, so no need to be worried!

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Hipcamper Katey

I can't recommend this state park more. It's absolutely gorgeous, esp. if you go in the spring. I recommend skipping Coe Ranch Campground (no privacy/seclusion) and spending more $$ to camp at a Manzanita Group Campsite. Or backpacking in to Poverty Flat).

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Hipcamper Hipcamper
Hipcamper

This is a massive park, so make sure you have adequate water for your hike and a map.

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Hipcamper Emma

There are lots of trails that parallel the dirt roads - it is almost always worth taking them even if they add a few miles. The grades are much easier and you will be much close to the wildflowers. Also, don't forget to check for ticks when you get home.

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Hipcamper Brian

Nice smaller sized campground only 20-30 min from the 101 freeway, would recommend to friends. We stayed at campsite 13 which was by far the most private campground we saw, and had a great time. Some of the other campsites looked very cozy and open, get one on the eastern outside of the loop if you want to have some shade.

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Hipcamper Brian

Another thing to add--when putting it in google maps make sure to enter Coe Ranch Campground, not Henry Coe State Park. If you get directions to the state park it will take you to the completely wrong place and you will get very lost... :P

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Hipcamper Hipcamper
Hipcamper

This is considered to be a hidden gem… you won’t find the crowds here!

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Hipcamper Hipcamper
Hipcamper

Wildflowers can be quite spectacular in the Spring.

Hipcamper Nathan

Its either hot or pouring rain here in my experience but still full of good memories!

Hipcamper Julie

Can get super hot! Allergy city.

Hipcamper Jenna

Loved camping at Henry Coe! The weekend we visited was especially quiet, and we didn't see many other backpackers or campers. It was my friend's first time backpacking, so the shorter distances to the backpacking sites were helpful for easing into it. We also woke up to turkeys gobbling by our tent!

History of Henry W. Coe State Park

At one point, massive tribes of hunter gatherers lived in these lands (over 10,000 years ago!) The hunters set up villages in areas near water and lived there until the 1700’s, when Spanish missionaries arrived and sent them to the nearby missions in San Jose, San Juan and Santa Cruz.
Throughout the 1800’s, sheepherders roamed the land and built very simple homes. The homes provided them with protection and enable them to focus on herding sheep.
In the mid-late 1800’s the gold rush came in full swing. The area was also mined for copper, as there was a big need for the metal in the Civil War. In fact, today you can still see some of the scars from the mining operations.
Towards the end of the 1800’s, there were many people settled on the land, however many of them sold to men who were “multiple homestead owners.” They would combine the properties and form large cattle ranches. These ranches provided the basis for the park today.
In the early 1900’s Henry Willard Coe, a wealthy rancher at the time, had his first daughter, Rhoda. Rhoda was passionate about the outdoors and in 1953 she gave her family’s ranch to the state of California. This was in her beloved father’s memory. Her lifelong passion for the outdoors led to providing the people of California with this amazing park.