China Camp State Park

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About China Camp State Park

Nestled on the the shoreline of San Pablo Bay, magnificent panoramic views and miles of multi-use trails greet visitors to China Camp State Park. From the massive salt marsh, to wide open meadows and expansive oak habitats, there is a natural beauty to China Camp that is truly unique. History buffs, water enthusiasts, hikers, runners, cyclists and equestrians will all find unforgettable experiences at China Camp.

Campgrounds in China Camp

Back Ranch Meadows Campground

1. Back Ranch Meadows Campground

100% Recommend (3 Responses)

What’s that good looking little parcel of land on the shores of San Pablo Bay? That’s Back Ranch Meadows Campground! As you’ll soon see, this...

Clinton
Clinton: Just camped at site 28 for the weekend. Love this campground! Super organized and facilities were taken care of. I would...
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China Camp
hipcamper
February 1st, 2015
China Camp
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February 16th, 2015
China Camp
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June 5th, 2015
China Camp
hipcamper
February 1st, 2015
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9 Reviews

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Hipcamper Clinton

Just camped at site 28 for the weekend. Love this campground! Super organized and facilities were taken care of. I would recommend the sites closer to the parking lot for a great view of the bay (site #26, 27, 28). For a more secluded spot, #30 is farther away from the crowds. Overall, love the campground and we will be back again!

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Hipcamper Briana

Be aware that when it's warm, there are yellow jackets everywhere - meaning, get used to having a few constantly hovering around you. Raccoons are rather brave at night - I'd bring a lock for the food locker just in case. Awesome range of campsites!

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Hipcamper Cydney

Made a reservation for 005 - it was incredibly hot as there are not many trees, we did go early in the day, around 3pm the heat was unbearable. We noticed some campsites were still open so we had asked if we could move our camping gear to a site that was more shaded, the ranger was more than happy to let us switch sites. The campsite has lots of lovely critters, wild turkeys, squirrels, little salamanders. At night the raccoons will come out. There are plenty of wasp traps so there are not a lot of bees around the campsites, however, there are lots of fruit flies and very few mosquitoes. I had taken my camera with me and added more photos of the campsites. Will definitely be going again.

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Hipcamper Hipcamper
Hipcamper

Check out the Quan Bros. snack shop in China Camp Village. Meet Frank, the sole resident of the village!

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Hipcamper Hipcamper
Hipcamper

We recommend site 26 at the campground, it’s up a small hill and is secluded.

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Hipcamper Hipcamper
Hipcamper

Live the life of luxury (well “camping luxury) and take a shower in the coin-operated showers (bring quarters!)

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Hipcamper Allie

Camped there for Thanksgiving weekend! We had a rough time with wildlife at night. China Camp is beautiful and it was great to see quails running around everywhere!

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Hipcamper Wilfred

even though site #30 has a slight slope, it's the one closest to the other parking area. It's best for when you have a lot of stuff to haul.

History of China Camp State Park

A Chinese shrimp-fishing village thrived on this site in the 1880’s. Nearly 500 people, originally from Canton, China, lived in the village. In its heyday, there were three general stores, a marine supply store and a barber shop.
Fishermen by trade in their native country, they gravitated to the work they knew best. Over 90% of the shrimp they netted were dried and shipped to China or Chinese communities throughout the US. The museum at China Camp Village helps tell the story of these hardy shrimp fishermen.
If you want to learn more, check out this quick video on this incredibly unique place.