About 20 miles from the coast, in the Anderson Valley lies this pristine 816 acre park. Because it is further inland, it is warmer than most of California’s coastal redwood forests. Here you will see old-growth coastal redwoods at their best - some trees are over 300 feet tall and nearly 1000 years old! Whether you’re in for swimming, boating, or simply hiking through the redwoods, there is something for everyone (not too mention wine tasting at one of the many nearby wineries)!

Camping


Tips


Word on the street (or in the forest) is site #32 is the jam!

This is wine country you’re camping in. Check out one of the nearby vineyards like Navarro and bring home some Cabernet for your camping feast!

Bathrooms are fairly basic, so bring your own soap, wet wipes, etc if needed

Philo Apple Farm is right next door and there is some gooood stuff in there.

Anderson Valley Brewing is nearby and has great beer for you to slurp on.

The hiking here is pretty chill (not overly strenuous), so good for families.

The creek is fairly safe and known for its frogs, turtles and newts - perfect for adventurous kids (and grownups!) to explore.

The nearby coastal beaches are a quick thirty minute drive and make for a great day trip.

Activities


Biking

Four hike-and-bike campsites are available to cyclists visiting the park. For information on riding in the park, contact the park office.

Boating

Motorized boating isn’t really available at this park, but that doesn’t mean you can’t explore via watercraft! Grab your paddle and check out the kayaking and canoeing section of activities.

Foraging

Hendy Woods is a mushroom lovers dream. During different seasons, visitors can find a wide selection of wild mushrooms growing throughout the park. Mendocino County even holds a mushroom festival where mushroom lovers can come together in different state parks and sample the county’s picks of the season. We hear there’s wine and beer too…

Hiking

Big Hendy has an amazing display of Redwood groves at their greatest. By far the best redwoods in Hendy Woods are in Big Hendy, an 80-acre redwood grove. Big Hendy Trail is a level, 1.6-mile trail that we highly recommend, the Upper Loop is definitely the most impressive part...check it out and frolick around some big a** trees!

Kayaking & Canoeing

There are over 20 miles of kayaking or canoeing to be done on the glorious Navarro River. It’s kinda awesome because the river is lined with redwoods and can be completed by a novice paddler. For more info, check out our friends at American Whitewater.

Swimming

Keen for a dip in the fresh mountain water? Well you can jump straight into the Navarro River. This swimming hole is a safe haven when summer temperatures become unbearable.

Wildlife Watching

Hendy Woods is perfect for any animal lover! The woods are rich with wildlife such as mountain lions, deer, gray foxes and black bears.

Wine & Beer Tasting

Anderson Valley also happens to be host of some of the best wineries and breweries in the region (rock on!). If Pinot Noir is your thing, make sure to check out Husch Vineyards, the oldest winery in the Valley. Our favorite pick however, is Anderson Valley Brewing Company . They make great brew and also have a killer disc golf course on the brewery grounds!

History


The two groves of redwood and the park which was constructed around them bear the name of Joshua P. Hendy, who in the late 1800's first claimed this beautiful area as his own.
Hendy found something within the peace and quiet of these moss encrusted groves that made him vow that neither saw nor ax would ever lay bare the inner bark of these giants. True to his word, as long as the land was his, the trees were never harmed.
California was growing and the need for lumber was great. After Joshua P. Hendy died, the groves were sold. Down came the giant trees in the outlying areas and off to the mills they were hauled. Timber was cut and removed from all sides of the big groves, but never was an order given to attack the giants standing there..
Hendy Woods was sold to the people of California in August of 1958, to become one of our finest state parks.